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Don't Push This Button : Phoenician Sarcophagi, Atomic Priesthoods and Nuclear Waste

Wikander, Ola LU (2015) In Årsbok. Vetenskapssocieteten i Lund p.109-124
Abstract
The article discusses the impact of historical sciences, classical philology and religious studies on the field of “Nuclear Semiotics”, the scholarly discussion concerning communicating information about nuclear waste disposal into the far future. The author uses examples such as a Phoenician funerary inscription, the Antikythera Mechanism, ancient water power, and the reconstruction of mythology to shed light on problems inherent in such communication, especially in schemes such as Thomas Sebeok’s idea of a pseudo-religious “Atomic Priesthood” that would perpetuate the tradition about stored nuclear waste. The article also aims at pointing out some ways in which the “nuclear waste question” can make historians view their own field in new... (More)
The article discusses the impact of historical sciences, classical philology and religious studies on the field of “Nuclear Semiotics”, the scholarly discussion concerning communicating information about nuclear waste disposal into the far future. The author uses examples such as a Phoenician funerary inscription, the Antikythera Mechanism, ancient water power, and the reconstruction of mythology to shed light on problems inherent in such communication, especially in schemes such as Thomas Sebeok’s idea of a pseudo-religious “Atomic Priesthood” that would perpetuate the tradition about stored nuclear waste. The article also aims at pointing out some ways in which the “nuclear waste question” can make historians view their own field in new ways. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Nuclear semiotics, nuclear waste, Phoenician, Eshmunazar, Eshmunazor, Thomas Sebeok, atomic priesthood, Indo-European, Hebrew Bible, Old Testament, Unleavened bread, horse sacrifice, dragons
in
Årsbok. Vetenskapssocieteten i Lund
pages
109 - 124
publisher
Vetenskapssocieteten i Lund
ISSN
0349-053X
project
Ancient texts in ancient tongues - nuclear waste and future knowledge
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5ce3e0f3-572a-49c7-8daa-6dd0f0877e87 (old id 4882896)
date added to LUP
2014-12-29 11:32:33
date last changed
2016-04-15 23:50:33
@article{5ce3e0f3-572a-49c7-8daa-6dd0f0877e87,
  abstract     = {The article discusses the impact of historical sciences, classical philology and religious studies on the field of “Nuclear Semiotics”, the scholarly discussion concerning communicating information about nuclear waste disposal into the far future. The author uses examples such as a Phoenician funerary inscription, the Antikythera Mechanism, ancient water power, and the reconstruction of mythology to shed light on problems inherent in such communication, especially in schemes such as Thomas Sebeok’s idea of a pseudo-religious “Atomic Priesthood” that would perpetuate the tradition about stored nuclear waste. The article also aims at pointing out some ways in which the “nuclear waste question” can make historians view their own field in new ways.},
  author       = {Wikander, Ola},
  issn         = {0349-053X},
  keyword      = {Nuclear semiotics,nuclear waste,Phoenician,Eshmunazar,Eshmunazor,Thomas Sebeok,atomic priesthood,Indo-European,Hebrew Bible,Old Testament,Unleavened bread,horse sacrifice,dragons},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {109--124},
  publisher    = {Vetenskapssocieteten i Lund},
  series       = {Årsbok. Vetenskapssocieteten i Lund},
  title        = {Don't Push This Button : Phoenician Sarcophagi, Atomic Priesthoods and Nuclear Waste},
  year         = {2015},
}