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Survival, migration and neuronal differentiation of human fetal striatal and cortical neural stem cells grafted in stroke-damaged rat striatum

Darsalia, Vladimer LU ; Kallur, Therese LU and Kokaia, Zaal LU (2007) In European Journal of Neuroscience 26(3). p.605-614
Abstract
Stroke is a neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of disability in adult humans. Treatments to support efficient recovery in stroke patients are lacking. Several studies have demonstrated the ability of grafted neural stem cells (NSCs) to partly improve impaired neurological functions in stroke-subjected animals. Recently, we reported that NSCs from human fetal striatum and cortex exhibit region-specific differentiation in vitro, but survive, migrate and form neurons to a similar extent after intrastriatal transplantation in newborn rats. Here, we have transplanted the same cells into the stroke-damaged striatum of adult rats. The two types of NSCs exhibited a similar robust survival (30%) at 1 month after transplantation, and... (More)
Stroke is a neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of disability in adult humans. Treatments to support efficient recovery in stroke patients are lacking. Several studies have demonstrated the ability of grafted neural stem cells (NSCs) to partly improve impaired neurological functions in stroke-subjected animals. Recently, we reported that NSCs from human fetal striatum and cortex exhibit region-specific differentiation in vitro, but survive, migrate and form neurons to a similar extent after intrastriatal transplantation in newborn rats. Here, we have transplanted the same cells into the stroke-damaged striatum of adult rats. The two types of NSCs exhibited a similar robust survival (30%) at 1 month after transplantation, and migrated throughout the damaged striatum. Striatal NSCs migrated farther and occupied a larger volume of striatum. In the transplantation core, cells were undifferentiated and expressed nestin and, to a lesser extent, also GFAP, beta III-tubulin, DCX and calretinin, markers of immature neural lineage. Immunocytochemistry using markers of proliferation (p-H3 and Ki67) revealed a very low content of proliferating cells (< 1%) in the grafts. Human cells outside the transplantation core differentiated, exhibited mature neuronal morphology and expressed mature neuronal markers such as HuD, calbindin and parvalbumin. Interestingly, striatal NSCs generated a greater number of parvalbumin(+) and calbindin(+) neurons. Virtually none of the grafted cells differentiated into astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. Based on these data, human fetal striatum- and cortex-derived NSCs could be considered potentially safe and viable for transplantation, with strong neurogenic potential, for further exploration in animal models of stroke. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
transplantation, ischemia, neurosphere
in
European Journal of Neuroscience
volume
26
issue
3
pages
605 - 614
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000248598100007
  • scopus:34547630679
ISSN
1460-9568
DOI
10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05702.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4d100db9-2781-4f12-af03-211125cdeba3 (old id 656150)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17686040&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-12-11 17:10:21
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:43:00
@article{4d100db9-2781-4f12-af03-211125cdeba3,
  abstract     = {Stroke is a neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of disability in adult humans. Treatments to support efficient recovery in stroke patients are lacking. Several studies have demonstrated the ability of grafted neural stem cells (NSCs) to partly improve impaired neurological functions in stroke-subjected animals. Recently, we reported that NSCs from human fetal striatum and cortex exhibit region-specific differentiation in vitro, but survive, migrate and form neurons to a similar extent after intrastriatal transplantation in newborn rats. Here, we have transplanted the same cells into the stroke-damaged striatum of adult rats. The two types of NSCs exhibited a similar robust survival (30%) at 1 month after transplantation, and migrated throughout the damaged striatum. Striatal NSCs migrated farther and occupied a larger volume of striatum. In the transplantation core, cells were undifferentiated and expressed nestin and, to a lesser extent, also GFAP, beta III-tubulin, DCX and calretinin, markers of immature neural lineage. Immunocytochemistry using markers of proliferation (p-H3 and Ki67) revealed a very low content of proliferating cells (&lt; 1%) in the grafts. Human cells outside the transplantation core differentiated, exhibited mature neuronal morphology and expressed mature neuronal markers such as HuD, calbindin and parvalbumin. Interestingly, striatal NSCs generated a greater number of parvalbumin(+) and calbindin(+) neurons. Virtually none of the grafted cells differentiated into astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. Based on these data, human fetal striatum- and cortex-derived NSCs could be considered potentially safe and viable for transplantation, with strong neurogenic potential, for further exploration in animal models of stroke.},
  author       = {Darsalia, Vladimer and Kallur, Therese and Kokaia, Zaal},
  issn         = {1460-9568},
  keyword      = {transplantation,ischemia,neurosphere},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {605--614},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {European Journal of Neuroscience},
  title        = {Survival, migration and neuronal differentiation of human fetal striatal and cortical neural stem cells grafted in stroke-damaged rat striatum},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05702.x},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2007},
}