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Pictures and spoken descriptions elicit similar eye movements during mental imagery, both in light and in complete darkness

Johansson, Roger LU ; Holsanova, Jana LU and Holmqvist, Kenneth LU (2006) In Cognitive Science 30(6). p.1053-1079
Abstract
This study provides evidence that eye movements reflect the positions of objects while participants listen to a spoken description, retell a previously heard spoken description, and describe a previously seen picture. This effect is equally strong in retelling from memory, irrespective of whether the original elicitation was spoken or visual. In addition, this effect occurs both while watching a blank white board and while sitting in complete darkness. This study includes 4 experiments. The first 2 experiments measured eye movements of participants looking at a blank white board. Experiment I monitors eye movements of participants on 2 occasions: first, when participants listened to a prerecorded spoken scene description; second, when... (More)
This study provides evidence that eye movements reflect the positions of objects while participants listen to a spoken description, retell a previously heard spoken description, and describe a previously seen picture. This effect is equally strong in retelling from memory, irrespective of whether the original elicitation was spoken or visual. In addition, this effect occurs both while watching a blank white board and while sitting in complete darkness. This study includes 4 experiments. The first 2 experiments measured eye movements of participants looking at a blank white board. Experiment I monitors eye movements of participants on 2 occasions: first, when participants listened to a prerecorded spoken scene description; second, when participants were later retelling it from memory. Experiment 2 first monitored eye movements of participants as they studied a complex picture visually, and then later as they described it from memory. The second pair of experiments (Experiments 3 and 4) replicated Experiments I and 2 with the only difference being that they were executed in complete darkness. This method of analysis differentiated between eye movements that are categorically correct relative to the positions of the whole eye gaze pattern (global correspondence) and eye movements that are only locally correct (local correspondence). The discussion relates the findings to the current debate on mental imagery. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
imagery, perception, visual and verbal elicitation, darkness, eye movements, light, attention, visual deixis
in
Cognitive Science
volume
30
issue
6
pages
1053 - 1079
publisher
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
external identifiers
  • wos:000242915300004
  • scopus:33846196967
ISSN
0364-0213
DOI
10.1207/s15516709cog0000_86
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
658188fe-798c-4b57-b97c-14831cf625d4 (old id 681808)
date added to LUP
2008-01-05 14:12:56
date last changed
2019-04-21 03:32:44
@article{658188fe-798c-4b57-b97c-14831cf625d4,
  abstract     = {This study provides evidence that eye movements reflect the positions of objects while participants listen to a spoken description, retell a previously heard spoken description, and describe a previously seen picture. This effect is equally strong in retelling from memory, irrespective of whether the original elicitation was spoken or visual. In addition, this effect occurs both while watching a blank white board and while sitting in complete darkness. This study includes 4 experiments. The first 2 experiments measured eye movements of participants looking at a blank white board. Experiment I monitors eye movements of participants on 2 occasions: first, when participants listened to a prerecorded spoken scene description; second, when participants were later retelling it from memory. Experiment 2 first monitored eye movements of participants as they studied a complex picture visually, and then later as they described it from memory. The second pair of experiments (Experiments 3 and 4) replicated Experiments I and 2 with the only difference being that they were executed in complete darkness. This method of analysis differentiated between eye movements that are categorically correct relative to the positions of the whole eye gaze pattern (global correspondence) and eye movements that are only locally correct (local correspondence). The discussion relates the findings to the current debate on mental imagery.},
  author       = {Johansson, Roger and Holsanova, Jana and Holmqvist, Kenneth},
  issn         = {0364-0213},
  keyword      = {imagery,perception,visual and verbal elicitation,darkness,eye movements,light,attention,visual deixis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1053--1079},
  publisher    = {Lawrence Erlbaum Associates},
  series       = {Cognitive Science},
  title        = {Pictures and spoken descriptions elicit similar eye movements during mental imagery, both in light and in complete darkness},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15516709cog0000_86},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2006},
}