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Antimicrobial peptides derived from growth factors

Malmsten, Martin; Davoudi, Mina LU ; Walse, Bjorn; Rydengård, Victoria LU ; Pasupuleti, Mukesh LU ; Mörgelin, Matthias LU and Schmidtchen, Artur LU (2007) In Growth Factors 25(1). p.60-70
Abstract
Growth factors, comprising diverse protein and peptide families, are involved in a multitude of developmental processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Here we show that peptides derived from HB-EGF, amphiregulin, hepatocyte growth factor, PDGF-A and PDGF-B, as well as various FGFs are antimicrobial, demonstrating a previously unknown activity of growth factor-derived peptides. The peptides killed the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, as well as the fungus Candida albicans. Several peptides were also active against the Gram-positive S. aureus. Electron microscopy analysis of peptide-treated bacteria, paired with analysis of peptide effects on... (More)
Growth factors, comprising diverse protein and peptide families, are involved in a multitude of developmental processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Here we show that peptides derived from HB-EGF, amphiregulin, hepatocyte growth factor, PDGF-A and PDGF-B, as well as various FGFs are antimicrobial, demonstrating a previously unknown activity of growth factor-derived peptides. The peptides killed the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, as well as the fungus Candida albicans. Several peptides were also active against the Gram-positive S. aureus. Electron microscopy analysis of peptide-treated bacteria, paired with analysis of peptide effects on liposomes, showed that the peptides exerted membrane-breaking effects similar to those seen after treatment with the "classical" human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Furthermore, HB-EGF was antibacterial per se, and its epitope GKRKKKGKGLGKKRDPCLRKYK retained its activity in presence of physiological salt and plasma. No discernible hemolysis was noted for the growth factor-derived peptides. Besides providing novel templates for design of peptide-based antimicrobials, our findings demonstrate a previously undisclosed link between the family of growth factors and antimicrobial peptides, both of which are induced during tissue remodelling and repair. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
liposome, heparin, growth factors, antimicrobial
in
Growth Factors
volume
25
issue
1
pages
60 - 70
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000246340700008
  • scopus:34247627920
ISSN
0897-7194
DOI
10.1080/08977190701344120
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e4a4e6c8-2c88-4163-8e98-dc39d83a07ab (old id 662658)
date added to LUP
2007-12-13 15:44:19
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:35:10
@article{e4a4e6c8-2c88-4163-8e98-dc39d83a07ab,
  abstract     = {Growth factors, comprising diverse protein and peptide families, are involved in a multitude of developmental processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Here we show that peptides derived from HB-EGF, amphiregulin, hepatocyte growth factor, PDGF-A and PDGF-B, as well as various FGFs are antimicrobial, demonstrating a previously unknown activity of growth factor-derived peptides. The peptides killed the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, as well as the fungus Candida albicans. Several peptides were also active against the Gram-positive S. aureus. Electron microscopy analysis of peptide-treated bacteria, paired with analysis of peptide effects on liposomes, showed that the peptides exerted membrane-breaking effects similar to those seen after treatment with the "classical" human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Furthermore, HB-EGF was antibacterial per se, and its epitope GKRKKKGKGLGKKRDPCLRKYK retained its activity in presence of physiological salt and plasma. No discernible hemolysis was noted for the growth factor-derived peptides. Besides providing novel templates for design of peptide-based antimicrobials, our findings demonstrate a previously undisclosed link between the family of growth factors and antimicrobial peptides, both of which are induced during tissue remodelling and repair.},
  author       = {Malmsten, Martin and Davoudi, Mina and Walse, Bjorn and Rydengård, Victoria and Pasupuleti, Mukesh and Mörgelin, Matthias and Schmidtchen, Artur},
  issn         = {0897-7194},
  keyword      = {liposome,heparin,growth factors,antimicrobial},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {60--70},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Growth Factors},
  title        = {Antimicrobial peptides derived from growth factors},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08977190701344120},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2007},
}