Advanced

Comparable effects of breakfast meals varying in protein source on appetite and subsequent energy intake in healthy males

Dougkas, Anestis LU and Östman, Elin LU (2017) In European Journal of Nutrition
Abstract

Purpose: The satiating effect of animal vs plant proteins remains unknown. The present study examined the effects of breakfasts containing animal proteins [milk (AP)], a blend of plant proteins [oat, pea and potato (VP)] or 50:50 mixture of the two (MP) compared with a carbohydrate-rich meal (CHO) on appetite, energy intake (EI) and metabolic measures. Methods: A total of 28 males [mean age 27.4 (±SD 4.2) years, BMI 23.4 (±2.1) kg/m2] consumed three isoenergetic (1674 kJ) rice puddings matched for energy density and macronutrient content as breakfast (25% E from protein) in a single-blind, randomised, cross over design. Appetite ratings and blood samples were collected and assessed at baseline and every 30 and 60 min,... (More)

Purpose: The satiating effect of animal vs plant proteins remains unknown. The present study examined the effects of breakfasts containing animal proteins [milk (AP)], a blend of plant proteins [oat, pea and potato (VP)] or 50:50 mixture of the two (MP) compared with a carbohydrate-rich meal (CHO) on appetite, energy intake (EI) and metabolic measures. Methods: A total of 28 males [mean age 27.4 (±SD 4.2) years, BMI 23.4 (±2.1) kg/m2] consumed three isoenergetic (1674 kJ) rice puddings matched for energy density and macronutrient content as breakfast (25% E from protein) in a single-blind, randomised, cross over design. Appetite ratings and blood samples were collected and assessed at baseline and every 30 and 60 min, respectively, until an ad libitum test meal was served 3.5 h later. Free-living appetite was recorded hourly and EI in weighed food records for the remainder of the day. Results: No differences in subjective appetite ratings were observed after consumption of the AP, VP and MP. Furthermore, there were no differences between the AP, VP, MP and CHO breakfasts in ad libitum EI and self-reported EI during the remainder of the day. Although insulin metabolism was not affected, CHO induced a higher glucose response (P = 0.001) and total amino acids concentration was in the order of AP = MP > VP > CHO breakfast (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Manipulating the protein source of foods consumed as breakfast, elicited comparable effects on appetite and EI at both laboratory and free-living environment in healthy men.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Amino acids, Appetite, Energy intake, Insulin, Milk proteins, Pea protein
in
European Journal of Nutrition
pages
12 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85014012095
ISSN
1436-6207
DOI
10.1007/s00394-017-1392-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
66ae1b06-c19f-46b2-95f4-a607b15ebf7d
date added to LUP
2017-03-13 10:28:47
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:55:00
@article{66ae1b06-c19f-46b2-95f4-a607b15ebf7d,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose: The satiating effect of animal vs plant proteins remains unknown. The present study examined the effects of breakfasts containing animal proteins [milk (AP)], a blend of plant proteins [oat, pea and potato (VP)] or 50:50 mixture of the two (MP) compared with a carbohydrate-rich meal (CHO) on appetite, energy intake (EI) and metabolic measures. Methods: A total of 28 males [mean age 27.4 (±SD 4.2) years, BMI 23.4 (±2.1) kg/m<sup>2</sup>] consumed three isoenergetic (1674 kJ) rice puddings matched for energy density and macronutrient content as breakfast (25% E from protein) in a single-blind, randomised, cross over design. Appetite ratings and blood samples were collected and assessed at baseline and every 30 and 60 min, respectively, until an ad libitum test meal was served 3.5 h later. Free-living appetite was recorded hourly and EI in weighed food records for the remainder of the day. Results: No differences in subjective appetite ratings were observed after consumption of the AP, VP and MP. Furthermore, there were no differences between the AP, VP, MP and CHO breakfasts in ad libitum EI and self-reported EI during the remainder of the day. Although insulin metabolism was not affected, CHO induced a higher glucose response (P = 0.001) and total amino acids concentration was in the order of AP = MP &gt; VP &gt; CHO breakfast (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Manipulating the protein source of foods consumed as breakfast, elicited comparable effects on appetite and EI at both laboratory and free-living environment in healthy men.</p>},
  author       = {Dougkas, Anestis and Östman, Elin},
  issn         = {1436-6207},
  keyword      = {Amino acids,Appetite,Energy intake,Insulin,Milk proteins,Pea protein},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  pages        = {12},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Nutrition},
  title        = {Comparable effects of breakfast meals varying in protein source on appetite and subsequent energy intake in healthy males},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1392-4},
  year         = {2017},
}