Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

The association between meat and fish consumption and bladder cancer risk : a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies

Dianatinasab, Mostafa ; Wesselius, Anke ; de Loeij, Tessa ; Salehi-Abargouei, Amin ; Yu, Evan Y.W. ; Fararouei, Mohammad ; Brinkman, Maree ; van den Brandt, Piet ; White, Emily and Weiderpass, Elisabete , et al. (2021) In European Journal of Epidemiology 36(8). p.781-792
Abstract

Evidence on the effects of meat consumption from different sources on the risk of bladder cancer (BC) is limited and controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the associations between meat consumption and BC risk using a pooled data approach. Individual data from 11 prospective cohorts comprising 2848 BC cases and 515,697 non-cases with a total of 5,498,025 person-years of follow-up was pooled and analysed to investigate the potential associations between total red meat and products, red meat, processed meat, poultry and total fish and BC risk. Hazard ratios (HRs), with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were estimated using Cox regression models stratified on cohort. Overall, an increased BC risk was found for... (More)

Evidence on the effects of meat consumption from different sources on the risk of bladder cancer (BC) is limited and controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the associations between meat consumption and BC risk using a pooled data approach. Individual data from 11 prospective cohorts comprising 2848 BC cases and 515,697 non-cases with a total of 5,498,025 person-years of follow-up was pooled and analysed to investigate the potential associations between total red meat and products, red meat, processed meat, poultry and total fish and BC risk. Hazard ratios (HRs), with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were estimated using Cox regression models stratified on cohort. Overall, an increased BC risk was found for high intake of organ meat (HR comparing highest with lowest tertile: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.36, p-trend = 0.03). On the contrary, a marginally inverse association was observed for total fish intake and BC risk among men (HR comparing highest with lowest tertile: 0.79, 95% CI 0.65, 0.97, p-trend = 0.04). No associations were observed for other meat sources. Results of this prospective study suggest that organ meat consumption may be associated with BC development. Replication in large-scale prospective studies and investigation of possible causal mechanisms is needed.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; and , et al. (More)
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; and (Less)
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bladder cancer, Epidemiology, Fish, Meat, Risk factor
in
European Journal of Epidemiology
volume
36
issue
8
pages
781 - 792
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85106462032
  • pmid:34036467
ISSN
0393-2990
DOI
10.1007/s10654-021-00762-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7113c32d-a2ec-4554-96dc-ab065fde80f1
date added to LUP
2021-06-14 11:05:02
date last changed
2022-06-21 22:32:35
@article{7113c32d-a2ec-4554-96dc-ab065fde80f1,
  abstract     = {{<p>Evidence on the effects of meat consumption from different sources on the risk of bladder cancer (BC) is limited and controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the associations between meat consumption and BC risk using a pooled data approach. Individual data from 11 prospective cohorts comprising 2848 BC cases and 515,697 non-cases with a total of 5,498,025 person-years of follow-up was pooled and analysed to investigate the potential associations between total red meat and products, red meat, processed meat, poultry and total fish and BC risk. Hazard ratios (HRs), with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were estimated using Cox regression models stratified on cohort. Overall, an increased BC risk was found for high intake of organ meat (HR comparing highest with lowest tertile: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.36, p-trend = 0.03). On the contrary, a marginally inverse association was observed for total fish intake and BC risk among men (HR comparing highest with lowest tertile: 0.79, 95% CI 0.65, 0.97, p-trend = 0.04). No associations were observed for other meat sources. Results of this prospective study suggest that organ meat consumption may be associated with BC development. Replication in large-scale prospective studies and investigation of possible causal mechanisms is needed.</p>}},
  author       = {{Dianatinasab, Mostafa and Wesselius, Anke and de Loeij, Tessa and Salehi-Abargouei, Amin and Yu, Evan Y.W. and Fararouei, Mohammad and Brinkman, Maree and van den Brandt, Piet and White, Emily and Weiderpass, Elisabete and Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence and Gunter, Marc J. and Huybrechts, Inge and Liedberg, Fredrik and Skeie, Guri and Tjonneland, Anne and Riboli, Elio and Zeegers, Maurice P.}},
  issn         = {{0393-2990}},
  keywords     = {{Bladder cancer; Epidemiology; Fish; Meat; Risk factor}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{8}},
  pages        = {{781--792}},
  publisher    = {{Springer}},
  series       = {{European Journal of Epidemiology}},
  title        = {{The association between meat and fish consumption and bladder cancer risk : a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10654-021-00762-4}},
  doi          = {{10.1007/s10654-021-00762-4}},
  volume       = {{36}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}