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Prenatal exposure to environmental chemical contaminants and asthma and eczema in school-age children

Smit, L. A. M.; Lenters, V.; Hoyer, B. B.; Lindh, Christian LU ; Pedersen, H. S.; Liermontova, I.; Jönsson, Bo A LU ; Piersma, A. H.; Bonde, J. P. and Toft, G., et al. (2015) In Allergy 70(6). p.653-660
Abstract
BackgroundEmerging evidence suggests that prenatal or early-life exposures to environmental contaminants may contribute to an increased risk of asthma and allergies in children. We aimed to the explore associations of prenatal exposures to a large set of environmental chemical contaminants with asthma and eczema in school-age children. MethodsWe studied 1024 mother-child pairs from Greenland and Ukraine from the INUENDO birth cohort. Data were collected by means of an interview-based questionnaire when the children were 5-9years of age. Questions from the ISAAC study were used to define asthma, eczema, and wheeze. We applied principal components analysis (PCA) to sixteen contaminants in maternal serum sampled during pregnancy, including... (More)
BackgroundEmerging evidence suggests that prenatal or early-life exposures to environmental contaminants may contribute to an increased risk of asthma and allergies in children. We aimed to the explore associations of prenatal exposures to a large set of environmental chemical contaminants with asthma and eczema in school-age children. MethodsWe studied 1024 mother-child pairs from Greenland and Ukraine from the INUENDO birth cohort. Data were collected by means of an interview-based questionnaire when the children were 5-9years of age. Questions from the ISAAC study were used to define asthma, eczema, and wheeze. We applied principal components analysis (PCA) to sixteen contaminants in maternal serum sampled during pregnancy, including perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), metabolites of diethylhexyl (DEHP) and diisononyl (DiNP) phthalates, PCB-153, and p,p-DDE. Scores of five principal components (PCs) explaining 70% of the variance were included in multiple logistic regression models. ResultsIn a meta-analysis that included both populations, the PC2 score, reflecting exposure to DiNP, was negatively associated with current eczema (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.52-0.96). Other associations were not consistent between the two populations. In Ukrainian children, the PC3 score (DEHP) was positively associated with current wheeze (adjusted OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.03-2.37), whereas the PC5 score, dominated by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), was inversely associated with current wheeze (OR 0.64, 0.41-0.99). In Greenlandic children, a negative association of PC4 (organochlorines) with ever eczema (OR 0.78, 0.61-0.99) was found. ConclusionsWe found limited evidence to support a link between prenatal exposure to environmental chemical contaminants and childhood asthma and eczema. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
analysis, multivariate, environmental pollutants, eczema, birth cohort, asthma
in
Allergy
volume
70
issue
6
pages
653 - 660
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000355245600005
  • scopus:84929963520
ISSN
1398-9995
DOI
10.1111/all.12605
language
English
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yes
id
d0cdf4b6-96fa-487b-b2c6-8b2caa4ecf83 (old id 7410515)
date added to LUP
2015-07-03 07:02:03
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:09:25
@article{d0cdf4b6-96fa-487b-b2c6-8b2caa4ecf83,
  abstract     = {BackgroundEmerging evidence suggests that prenatal or early-life exposures to environmental contaminants may contribute to an increased risk of asthma and allergies in children. We aimed to the explore associations of prenatal exposures to a large set of environmental chemical contaminants with asthma and eczema in school-age children. MethodsWe studied 1024 mother-child pairs from Greenland and Ukraine from the INUENDO birth cohort. Data were collected by means of an interview-based questionnaire when the children were 5-9years of age. Questions from the ISAAC study were used to define asthma, eczema, and wheeze. We applied principal components analysis (PCA) to sixteen contaminants in maternal serum sampled during pregnancy, including perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), metabolites of diethylhexyl (DEHP) and diisononyl (DiNP) phthalates, PCB-153, and p,p-DDE. Scores of five principal components (PCs) explaining 70% of the variance were included in multiple logistic regression models. ResultsIn a meta-analysis that included both populations, the PC2 score, reflecting exposure to DiNP, was negatively associated with current eczema (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.52-0.96). Other associations were not consistent between the two populations. In Ukrainian children, the PC3 score (DEHP) was positively associated with current wheeze (adjusted OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.03-2.37), whereas the PC5 score, dominated by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), was inversely associated with current wheeze (OR 0.64, 0.41-0.99). In Greenlandic children, a negative association of PC4 (organochlorines) with ever eczema (OR 0.78, 0.61-0.99) was found. ConclusionsWe found limited evidence to support a link between prenatal exposure to environmental chemical contaminants and childhood asthma and eczema.},
  author       = {Smit, L. A. M. and Lenters, V. and Hoyer, B. B. and Lindh, Christian and Pedersen, H. S. and Liermontova, I. and Jönsson, Bo A and Piersma, A. H. and Bonde, J. P. and Toft, G. and Vermeulen, R. and Heederik, D.},
  issn         = {1398-9995},
  keyword      = {analysis,multivariate,environmental pollutants,eczema,birth cohort,asthma},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {653--660},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Allergy},
  title        = {Prenatal exposure to environmental chemical contaminants and asthma and eczema in school-age children},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/all.12605},
  volume       = {70},
  year         = {2015},
}