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Probiotic strains of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium affect the translocation and intestinal load of Enterobacteriaceae differently after D-galactosamine-induced liver injury in rats

Osman, Nadia LU ; Adawi, Diya LU ; Ahrné, Siv LU ; Jeppsson, Bengt LU and Molin, Göran LU (2005) In Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease 17(1). p.40-46
Abstract
In an acute liver injury model we compared the effects of different Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains on bacterial translocation, intestinal load of Enterobacteriaceae and the extent of liver injury. This was an experimental study carried out in an university hospital in Sweden. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups: liver injury control and five groups of

liver injury with administration of three different Lactobacillus and two Bifidobacterium strains (orally twice daily for 8 days). Liver injury was induced on the eighth day by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactosamine (1.1 g/kg body weight). The main outcome measures were samples collected 24 h after injury. Liver enzymes and bilirubin serum levels,... (More)
In an acute liver injury model we compared the effects of different Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains on bacterial translocation, intestinal load of Enterobacteriaceae and the extent of liver injury. This was an experimental study carried out in an university hospital in Sweden. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups: liver injury control and five groups of

liver injury with administration of three different Lactobacillus and two Bifidobacterium strains (orally twice daily for 8 days). Liver injury was induced on the eighth day by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactosamine (1.1 g/kg body weight). The main outcome measures were samples collected 24 h after injury. Liver enzymes and bilirubin serum levels, bacterial translocation (to arterial and portal blood, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes), intestinal load of Enterobacteriaceae in relation to lactobacilli and the total bacterial load were evaluated and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of translocating bacteria was carried out. Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 9843, Lactobacillus gasseri 5B3 and Bifidobacterium infantis DSM 15158 decreased bacterial translocation to the liver compared with the liver injury control group. Lactobacillus paracasei DSM 13434 translocated to the liver. The Enterobacteriaceae count in the caecum decreased

in the L. plantarum DSM 9843, L. gasseri 5B3, Bifidobacterium ‘urinalis’ 3B1 and B. infantis DSM 15158 groups, while all the administered probiotics decreased it in the colon. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin were significantly lower in the L. plantarum DSM 9843 and B. infantis DSM 15158 groups compared with the liver injury control group. All test strains except L. paracasei DSM 13434 inhibited translocation to the liver. Instead, L. paracasei was found in the liver and it also failed to decrease the load of Enterobacteriaceae in caecum. The best strains in protecting the liver

during injury were L. plantarum DSM 9843 and B. infantis DSM 15158, as reflected by bilirubin and liver enzymes. Thus, there are major effectual differences between strains/species. In contrast, the phylogenetically most diverse strains, L. plantarum DSM 9843 and B. infantis DSM 15158, exercised the same effects. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
rats, D-galactosamine, Bacterial translocation, probiotics, liver injury
in
Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
volume
17
issue
1
pages
40 - 46
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:18844363737
ISSN
0891-060X
DOI
10.1080/08910600510028433
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
34a20eae-654e-4736-9fdf-b6bf915a4aab (old id 756432)
date added to LUP
2007-12-18 17:46:03
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:46:55
@article{34a20eae-654e-4736-9fdf-b6bf915a4aab,
  abstract     = {In an acute liver injury model we compared the effects of different Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains on bacterial translocation, intestinal load of Enterobacteriaceae and the extent of liver injury. This was an experimental study carried out in an university hospital in Sweden. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups: liver injury control and five groups of<br/><br>
liver injury with administration of three different Lactobacillus and two Bifidobacterium strains (orally twice daily for 8 days). Liver injury was induced on the eighth day by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactosamine (1.1 g/kg body weight). The main outcome measures were samples collected 24 h after injury. Liver enzymes and bilirubin serum levels, bacterial translocation (to arterial and portal blood, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes), intestinal load of Enterobacteriaceae in relation to lactobacilli and the total bacterial load were evaluated and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of translocating bacteria was carried out. Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 9843, Lactobacillus gasseri 5B3 and Bifidobacterium infantis DSM 15158 decreased bacterial translocation to the liver compared with the liver injury control group. Lactobacillus paracasei DSM 13434 translocated to the liver. The Enterobacteriaceae count in the caecum decreased<br/><br>
in the L. plantarum DSM 9843, L. gasseri 5B3, Bifidobacterium ‘urinalis’ 3B1 and B. infantis DSM 15158 groups, while all the administered probiotics decreased it in the colon. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin were significantly lower in the L. plantarum DSM 9843 and B. infantis DSM 15158 groups compared with the liver injury control group. All test strains except L. paracasei DSM 13434 inhibited translocation to the liver. Instead, L. paracasei was found in the liver and it also failed to decrease the load of Enterobacteriaceae in caecum. The best strains in protecting the liver<br/><br>
during injury were L. plantarum DSM 9843 and B. infantis DSM 15158, as reflected by bilirubin and liver enzymes. Thus, there are major effectual differences between strains/species. In contrast, the phylogenetically most diverse strains, L. plantarum DSM 9843 and B. infantis DSM 15158, exercised the same effects.},
  author       = {Osman, Nadia and Adawi, Diya and Ahrné, Siv and Jeppsson, Bengt and Molin, Göran},
  issn         = {0891-060X},
  keyword      = {rats,D-galactosamine,Bacterial translocation,probiotics,liver injury},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {40--46},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease},
  title        = {Probiotic strains of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium affect the translocation and intestinal load of Enterobacteriaceae differently after D-galactosamine-induced liver injury in rats},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08910600510028433},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2005},
}