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Traffic-related air pollution and child BMI—A study of prenatal exposure to nitrogen oxides and body mass index in children at the age of four years in Malmö, Sweden

Frondelius, Kasper LU ; Oudin, Anna LU and Malmqvist, Ebba LU (2018) In International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15(10).
Abstract

Traffic-related air pollution could be a danger to the health of children. Earlier studies have linked prenatal exposure to an increased risk of a range of diseases and negative health outcomes, including overweight and obesity. Presently, a knowledge gap exists in investigating the risk of overweight and obesity among children exposed to lower levels of air pollution in utero. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between prenatal traffic-related air pollution (nitrogen dioxides (NOx) and traffic density) and childhood overweight and obesity in Malmö, Sweden. A cohort, based on attendance of a four-year check-up examination at Swedish Child Health Care (CHC) centers, and a parent-assessed questionnaire provided... (More)

Traffic-related air pollution could be a danger to the health of children. Earlier studies have linked prenatal exposure to an increased risk of a range of diseases and negative health outcomes, including overweight and obesity. Presently, a knowledge gap exists in investigating the risk of overweight and obesity among children exposed to lower levels of air pollution in utero. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between prenatal traffic-related air pollution (nitrogen dioxides (NOx) and traffic density) and childhood overweight and obesity in Malmö, Sweden. A cohort, based on attendance of a four-year check-up examination at Swedish Child Health Care (CHC) centers, and a parent-assessed questionnaire provided data on body-mass index adjusted for four-year-old children (ISO-BMI) as well as socioeconomic and health variables. We estimated exposure by using traffic density and levels of NOx at the maternal geocoded residential level. Analysis of 5815 children was performed using binary logistic regression models. This study showed no associations of increased risk for childhood overweight or obesity through to prenatal exposure to NOx in this low-exposure setting. We further suggest analysis of risks related to exposure levels ranging between the ones presented here and those proposed in previous literature.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Air pollution, Children, Nitrogen oxides, Obesity, Overweight
in
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
volume
15
issue
10
publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
external identifiers
  • scopus:85055197567
ISSN
1661-7827
DOI
10.3390/ijerph15102294
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
75dd5410-e3a4-4f6c-b389-66385f68f25a
date added to LUP
2018-11-15 13:28:57
date last changed
2019-01-06 14:15:30
@article{75dd5410-e3a4-4f6c-b389-66385f68f25a,
  abstract     = {<p>Traffic-related air pollution could be a danger to the health of children. Earlier studies have linked prenatal exposure to an increased risk of a range of diseases and negative health outcomes, including overweight and obesity. Presently, a knowledge gap exists in investigating the risk of overweight and obesity among children exposed to lower levels of air pollution in utero. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between prenatal traffic-related air pollution (nitrogen dioxides (NO<sub>x</sub>) and traffic density) and childhood overweight and obesity in Malmö, Sweden. A cohort, based on attendance of a four-year check-up examination at Swedish Child Health Care (CHC) centers, and a parent-assessed questionnaire provided data on body-mass index adjusted for four-year-old children (ISO-BMI) as well as socioeconomic and health variables. We estimated exposure by using traffic density and levels of NO<sub>x</sub> at the maternal geocoded residential level. Analysis of 5815 children was performed using binary logistic regression models. This study showed no associations of increased risk for childhood overweight or obesity through to prenatal exposure to NO<sub>x</sub> in this low-exposure setting. We further suggest analysis of risks related to exposure levels ranging between the ones presented here and those proposed in previous literature.</p>},
  articleno    = {2294},
  author       = {Frondelius, Kasper and Oudin, Anna and Malmqvist, Ebba},
  issn         = {1661-7827},
  keyword      = {Air pollution,Children,Nitrogen oxides,Obesity,Overweight},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  number       = {10},
  publisher    = {Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)},
  series       = {International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health},
  title        = {Traffic-related air pollution and child BMI—A study of prenatal exposure to nitrogen oxides and body mass index in children at the age of four years in Malmö, Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102294},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2018},
}