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Invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome: the role of thrombophilia and EBV.

Holm, Karin LU ; Svensson, Peter LU and Rasmussen, Magnus LU (2015) In European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases 34(11). p.2199-2207
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was to describe the clinical spectrum of invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome, to examine the role of underlying thrombophilia and concomitant mononucleosis in Lemièrre's syndrome, and to describe thromboembolic complications. Patients with invasive F. necrophorum infections were identified either prospectively or retrospectively through the regional database of clinical microbiology from 2000 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed and blood samples from patients with Lemièrre's syndrome were collected for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology and screening for thrombophilia. Of the 65 patients included, 33 had Lemièrre's syndrome. Of the remaining 32 patients, other infections... (More)
The purpose of this investigation was to describe the clinical spectrum of invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome, to examine the role of underlying thrombophilia and concomitant mononucleosis in Lemièrre's syndrome, and to describe thromboembolic complications. Patients with invasive F. necrophorum infections were identified either prospectively or retrospectively through the regional database of clinical microbiology from 2000 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed and blood samples from patients with Lemièrre's syndrome were collected for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology and screening for thrombophilia. Of the 65 patients included, 33 had Lemièrre's syndrome. Of the remaining 32 patients, other infections of the respiratory tract and abdominal or urogenital infections were most common. Patients with Lemièrre's syndrome or other tonsillar infections were younger than patients from the other groups. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the 26 patients with severe sepsis on admittance had longer duration of symptoms. Three of five patients who developed distant manifestations had more than 14 days of symptoms. Jugular vein thrombosis was verified in 14 patients, two of whom developed serious complications. Three of 26 patients tested had factor V Leiden mutation, corresponding to the background prevalence. One of 22 patients tested had a concomitant EBV infection. This study confirms earlier studies of the clinical spectrum caused by F. necrophorum. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the study adds to the knowledge on thromboembolic outcome, demonstrating that jugular vein thrombosis may cause severe complications. The time to treatment seems to be important for the risk of severe disease. In this study, concomitant EBV infection or underlying thrombophilia was uncommon. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
volume
34
issue
11
pages
2199 - 2207
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:26272176
  • wos:000362962200009
  • scopus:84944352711
ISSN
1435-4373
DOI
10.1007/s10096-015-2469-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a8aded54-a4e7-4214-a8b7-881290093262 (old id 7841167)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26272176?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-09-05 18:41:43
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:06:27
@article{a8aded54-a4e7-4214-a8b7-881290093262,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this investigation was to describe the clinical spectrum of invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome, to examine the role of underlying thrombophilia and concomitant mononucleosis in Lemièrre's syndrome, and to describe thromboembolic complications. Patients with invasive F. necrophorum infections were identified either prospectively or retrospectively through the regional database of clinical microbiology from 2000 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed and blood samples from patients with Lemièrre's syndrome were collected for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology and screening for thrombophilia. Of the 65 patients included, 33 had Lemièrre's syndrome. Of the remaining 32 patients, other infections of the respiratory tract and abdominal or urogenital infections were most common. Patients with Lemièrre's syndrome or other tonsillar infections were younger than patients from the other groups. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the 26 patients with severe sepsis on admittance had longer duration of symptoms. Three of five patients who developed distant manifestations had more than 14 days of symptoms. Jugular vein thrombosis was verified in 14 patients, two of whom developed serious complications. Three of 26 patients tested had factor V Leiden mutation, corresponding to the background prevalence. One of 22 patients tested had a concomitant EBV infection. This study confirms earlier studies of the clinical spectrum caused by F. necrophorum. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the study adds to the knowledge on thromboembolic outcome, demonstrating that jugular vein thrombosis may cause severe complications. The time to treatment seems to be important for the risk of severe disease. In this study, concomitant EBV infection or underlying thrombophilia was uncommon.},
  author       = {Holm, Karin and Svensson, Peter and Rasmussen, Magnus},
  issn         = {1435-4373},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2199--2207},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome: the role of thrombophilia and EBV.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10096-015-2469-8},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2015},
}