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Cerebral palsy in southern Sweden II. Gross motor function and disabilities

Nordmark, E. LU ; Hägglund, G. LU and Lagergren, J. LU (2001) In Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics 90(11). p.1277-1282
Abstract

The gross motor function and disabilities in children with cerebral palsy in southern Sweden were investigated and related to clinical features. The study covered the birth year period 1990-1993 and comprised 167 children, 145 of them born in Sweden and 22 born abroad. The clinical features and gross motor function were analysed at a mean age of 6.8 y. Clinical features were obtained from a continuing healthcare follow-up programme. Gross motor function was classified according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Walking independently was possible for 86% of the hemiplegic, 63% of the pure ataxic, 61% of the diplegic and 21% of the dyskinetic children. None of the tetraplegic children was able to walk. The... (More)

The gross motor function and disabilities in children with cerebral palsy in southern Sweden were investigated and related to clinical features. The study covered the birth year period 1990-1993 and comprised 167 children, 145 of them born in Sweden and 22 born abroad. The clinical features and gross motor function were analysed at a mean age of 6.8 y. Clinical features were obtained from a continuing healthcare follow-up programme. Gross motor function was classified according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Walking independently was possible for 86% of the hemiplegic, 63% of the pure ataxic, 61% of the diplegic and 21% of the dyskinetic children. None of the tetraplegic children was able to walk. The classification of gross motor function revealed that 59% of the children were categorized into levels I and II (mildly disabled), 14% into level III (moderately disabled) and 27% into levels IV and V (severely disabled). Children born abroad were more severely disabled. Conclusion: The standardized age-related classification system GMFCS enabled a specific description of gross motor function in relation to clinical features. Significant differences between GMFCS levels and subgroups of diagnosis, aetiology, intellectual capacity, epilepsy and visual impairment were found.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cerebral palsy, Gross motor function
in
Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
volume
90
issue
11
pages
6 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:0035206938
  • pmid:11808899
ISSN
0803-5253
DOI
10.1080/080352501317130326
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
882a2121-4475-47af-92a6-09b2eef18164
date added to LUP
2019-06-25 09:47:36
date last changed
2020-01-13 02:06:04
@article{882a2121-4475-47af-92a6-09b2eef18164,
  abstract     = {<p>The gross motor function and disabilities in children with cerebral palsy in southern Sweden were investigated and related to clinical features. The study covered the birth year period 1990-1993 and comprised 167 children, 145 of them born in Sweden and 22 born abroad. The clinical features and gross motor function were analysed at a mean age of 6.8 y. Clinical features were obtained from a continuing healthcare follow-up programme. Gross motor function was classified according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Walking independently was possible for 86% of the hemiplegic, 63% of the pure ataxic, 61% of the diplegic and 21% of the dyskinetic children. None of the tetraplegic children was able to walk. The classification of gross motor function revealed that 59% of the children were categorized into levels I and II (mildly disabled), 14% into level III (moderately disabled) and 27% into levels IV and V (severely disabled). Children born abroad were more severely disabled. Conclusion: The standardized age-related classification system GMFCS enabled a specific description of gross motor function in relation to clinical features. Significant differences between GMFCS levels and subgroups of diagnosis, aetiology, intellectual capacity, epilepsy and visual impairment were found.</p>},
  author       = {Nordmark, E. and Hägglund, G. and Lagergren, J.},
  issn         = {0803-5253},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1277--1282},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics},
  title        = {Cerebral palsy in southern Sweden II. Gross motor function and disabilities},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/080352501317130326},
  doi          = {10.1080/080352501317130326},
  volume       = {90},
  year         = {2001},
}