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Imaginary companions, creativity, and self-image in middle childhood

Hoff, Eva LU (2005) In Creativity Research Journal 17(2-3). p.167-180
Abstract
This study investigates four questions: First, whether there is a relationship between imaginary companions and creative potential; second, whether children with negative self-images are more likely to have imaginary companions; third, whether there are gender differences among those children who have imaginary companions; and, finally, what aspects of imaginary companions and what characteristics of those who invent them are related to creativity. The measurements used were a questionnaire about imaginary companions, 3 estimates of creative potential, and a self-image inventory. Among the 69 participating 4th graders, 52% reported having (had) imaginary companions. The children with imaginary companions were more creative on 2 of 3... (More)
This study investigates four questions: First, whether there is a relationship between imaginary companions and creative potential; second, whether children with negative self-images are more likely to have imaginary companions; third, whether there are gender differences among those children who have imaginary companions; and, finally, what aspects of imaginary companions and what characteristics of those who invent them are related to creativity. The measurements used were a questionnaire about imaginary companions, 3 estimates of creative potential, and a self-image inventory. Among the 69 participating 4th graders, 52% reported having (had) imaginary companions. The children with imaginary companions were more creative on 2 of 3 estimates of creativity and had lower self-image scores. The self-image differences were greatest on the subscales measuring psychological well-being and peer relations. It was more common for girls to have imaginary companions. Aspects associated with creativity among the children with imaginary companions were, for example, elaboration of the companion's character and number of imaginary companions. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Imaginary companions, pretend playmates, make-believe friends
in
Creativity Research Journal
volume
17
issue
2-3
pages
167 - 180
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000230130200004
  • scopus:23844462212
ISSN
1040-0419
DOI
10.1207/s15326934crj1702&3_4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bc4bfecd-c209-4394-9538-8ac371e714bd (old id 895148)
date added to LUP
2008-01-16 11:09:32
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:28:26
@article{bc4bfecd-c209-4394-9538-8ac371e714bd,
  abstract     = {This study investigates four questions: First, whether there is a relationship between imaginary companions and creative potential; second, whether children with negative self-images are more likely to have imaginary companions; third, whether there are gender differences among those children who have imaginary companions; and, finally, what aspects of imaginary companions and what characteristics of those who invent them are related to creativity. The measurements used were a questionnaire about imaginary companions, 3 estimates of creative potential, and a self-image inventory. Among the 69 participating 4th graders, 52% reported having (had) imaginary companions. The children with imaginary companions were more creative on 2 of 3 estimates of creativity and had lower self-image scores. The self-image differences were greatest on the subscales measuring psychological well-being and peer relations. It was more common for girls to have imaginary companions. Aspects associated with creativity among the children with imaginary companions were, for example, elaboration of the companion's character and number of imaginary companions.},
  author       = {Hoff, Eva},
  issn         = {1040-0419},
  keyword      = {Imaginary companions,pretend playmates,make-believe friends},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2-3},
  pages        = {167--180},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Creativity Research Journal},
  title        = {Imaginary companions, creativity, and self-image in middle childhood},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15326934crj1702&3_4},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2005},
}