Advanced

Working memory and novel word learning in children with hearing impairment and children with specific language impairment

Hansson, Kristina LU ; Forsberg, Jessika LU ; Löfqvist, Anders LU ; Mäki-Torkko, Elina LU and Sahlén, Birgitta LU (2004) In International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders 39(3). p.401-422
Abstract
Background: Working memory is considered to influence a range of linguistic skills, i.e. vocabulary acquisition, sentence comprehension and reading. Several studies have pointed to limitations of working memory in children with specific language impairment. Few studies, however, have explored the role of working memory for language deficits in children with hearing impairment. Aims: The first aim was to compare children with mild-to-moderate bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, children with a preschool diagnosis of specific language impairment and children with normal language development, aged 9-12 years, for language and working memory. The special focus was on the role of working memory in learning new words for primary school... (More)
Background: Working memory is considered to influence a range of linguistic skills, i.e. vocabulary acquisition, sentence comprehension and reading. Several studies have pointed to limitations of working memory in children with specific language impairment. Few studies, however, have explored the role of working memory for language deficits in children with hearing impairment. Aims: The first aim was to compare children with mild-to-moderate bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, children with a preschool diagnosis of specific language impairment and children with normal language development, aged 9-12 years, for language and working memory. The special focus was on the role of working memory in learning new words for primary school age children. Methods & Procedures: The assessment of working memory included tests of phonological short-term memory and complex working memory. Novel word learning was assessed according to the methods of Gilbertson and Kamhi ( 1995). In addition, a range of language tests was used to assess language comprehension, output phonology and reading. Outcomes & Results: Children with hearing impairment performed significantly better than children with a preschool diagnosis of specific language impairment on tasks assessing novel word learning, complex working memory, sentence comprehension and reading accuracy. No significant correlation was found between phonological short-term memory and novel word learning in any group. The best predictor of novel word learning in children with specific language impairment and in children with hearing impairment was complex working memory. Furthermore, there was a close relationship between complex working memory and language in children with a preschool diagnosis of specific language impairment but not in children with hearing impairment. Conclusions: Complex working memory seems to play a significant role in vocabulary acquisition in primary school age children. The interpretation is that the results support theories suggesting a weakened influence of phonological short-term memory on novel word learning in school age children. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
children, hearing impairment, language impairment, vocabulary, working memory
in
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders
volume
39
issue
3
pages
401 - 422
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000221670500007
  • scopus:3042590285
ISSN
1368-2822
DOI
10.1080/13682820410001669887
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a7436cbd-1636-4949-805f-934657dadb1b (old id 898958)
date added to LUP
2008-01-10 16:04:37
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:28:02
@article{a7436cbd-1636-4949-805f-934657dadb1b,
  abstract     = {Background: Working memory is considered to influence a range of linguistic skills, i.e. vocabulary acquisition, sentence comprehension and reading. Several studies have pointed to limitations of working memory in children with specific language impairment. Few studies, however, have explored the role of working memory for language deficits in children with hearing impairment. Aims: The first aim was to compare children with mild-to-moderate bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, children with a preschool diagnosis of specific language impairment and children with normal language development, aged 9-12 years, for language and working memory. The special focus was on the role of working memory in learning new words for primary school age children. Methods & Procedures: The assessment of working memory included tests of phonological short-term memory and complex working memory. Novel word learning was assessed according to the methods of Gilbertson and Kamhi ( 1995). In addition, a range of language tests was used to assess language comprehension, output phonology and reading. Outcomes & Results: Children with hearing impairment performed significantly better than children with a preschool diagnosis of specific language impairment on tasks assessing novel word learning, complex working memory, sentence comprehension and reading accuracy. No significant correlation was found between phonological short-term memory and novel word learning in any group. The best predictor of novel word learning in children with specific language impairment and in children with hearing impairment was complex working memory. Furthermore, there was a close relationship between complex working memory and language in children with a preschool diagnosis of specific language impairment but not in children with hearing impairment. Conclusions: Complex working memory seems to play a significant role in vocabulary acquisition in primary school age children. The interpretation is that the results support theories suggesting a weakened influence of phonological short-term memory on novel word learning in school age children.},
  author       = {Hansson, Kristina and Forsberg, Jessika and Löfqvist, Anders and Mäki-Torkko, Elina and Sahlén, Birgitta},
  issn         = {1368-2822},
  keyword      = {children,hearing impairment,language impairment,vocabulary,working memory},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {401--422},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders},
  title        = {Working memory and novel word learning in children with hearing impairment and children with specific language impairment},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13682820410001669887},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2004},
}