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Caffeine Intake, Plasma Caffeine Level, and Kidney Function : A Mendelian Randomization Study

Giontella, Alice LU orcid ; de La Harpe, Roxane ; Cronje, Héléne T. ; Zagkos, Loukas ; Woolf, Benjamin ; Larsson, Susanna C. and Gill, Dipender (2023) In Nutrients 15(20).
Abstract

Caffeine is a psychoactive substance widely consumed worldwide, mainly via sources such as coffee and tea. The effects of caffeine on kidney function remain unclear. We leveraged the genetic variants in the CYP1A2 and AHR genes via the two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) framework to estimate the association of genetically predicted plasma caffeine and caffeine intake on kidney traits. Genetic association summary statistics on plasma caffeine levels and caffeine intake were taken from genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses of 9876 and of >47,000 European ancestry individuals, respectively. Genetically predicted plasma caffeine levels were associated with a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)... (More)

Caffeine is a psychoactive substance widely consumed worldwide, mainly via sources such as coffee and tea. The effects of caffeine on kidney function remain unclear. We leveraged the genetic variants in the CYP1A2 and AHR genes via the two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) framework to estimate the association of genetically predicted plasma caffeine and caffeine intake on kidney traits. Genetic association summary statistics on plasma caffeine levels and caffeine intake were taken from genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses of 9876 and of >47,000 European ancestry individuals, respectively. Genetically predicted plasma caffeine levels were associated with a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) measured using either creatinine or cystatin C. In contrast, genetically predicted caffeine intake was associated with an increase in eGFR and a low risk of chronic kidney disease. The discrepancy is likely attributable to faster metabolizers of caffeine consuming more caffeine-containing beverages to achieve the same pharmacological effect. Further research is needed to distinguish whether the observed effects on kidney function are driven by the harmful effects of higher plasma caffeine levels or the protective effects of greater intake of caffeine-containing beverages, particularly given the widespread use of drinks containing caffeine and the increasing burden of kidney disease.

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author
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
caffeine intake, caffeine level, causal inference, estimated glomerular filtration rate, genetically predicted coffee consumption, kidney function, Mendelian randomization
in
Nutrients
volume
15
issue
20
article number
4422
publisher
MDPI AG
external identifiers
  • pmid:37892497
  • scopus:85175448182
ISSN
2072-6643
DOI
10.3390/nu15204422
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8dbe1a67-1422-44ca-9b10-b726eaa1e305
date added to LUP
2023-11-24 09:43:09
date last changed
2024-02-21 16:53:15
@article{8dbe1a67-1422-44ca-9b10-b726eaa1e305,
  abstract     = {{<p>Caffeine is a psychoactive substance widely consumed worldwide, mainly via sources such as coffee and tea. The effects of caffeine on kidney function remain unclear. We leveraged the genetic variants in the CYP1A2 and AHR genes via the two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) framework to estimate the association of genetically predicted plasma caffeine and caffeine intake on kidney traits. Genetic association summary statistics on plasma caffeine levels and caffeine intake were taken from genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses of 9876 and of &gt;47,000 European ancestry individuals, respectively. Genetically predicted plasma caffeine levels were associated with a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) measured using either creatinine or cystatin C. In contrast, genetically predicted caffeine intake was associated with an increase in eGFR and a low risk of chronic kidney disease. The discrepancy is likely attributable to faster metabolizers of caffeine consuming more caffeine-containing beverages to achieve the same pharmacological effect. Further research is needed to distinguish whether the observed effects on kidney function are driven by the harmful effects of higher plasma caffeine levels or the protective effects of greater intake of caffeine-containing beverages, particularly given the widespread use of drinks containing caffeine and the increasing burden of kidney disease.</p>}},
  author       = {{Giontella, Alice and de La Harpe, Roxane and Cronje, Héléne T. and Zagkos, Loukas and Woolf, Benjamin and Larsson, Susanna C. and Gill, Dipender}},
  issn         = {{2072-6643}},
  keywords     = {{caffeine intake; caffeine level; causal inference; estimated glomerular filtration rate; genetically predicted coffee consumption; kidney function; Mendelian randomization}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{20}},
  publisher    = {{MDPI AG}},
  series       = {{Nutrients}},
  title        = {{Caffeine Intake, Plasma Caffeine Level, and Kidney Function : A Mendelian Randomization Study}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu15204422}},
  doi          = {{10.3390/nu15204422}},
  volume       = {{15}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}