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Population-based incidence rate of inpatient and outpatient surgical procedures in a high-income country

Omling, E. LU ; Jarnheimer, A. LU ; Rose, J.; Björk, J. LU ; Meara, J. G. and Hagander, L. LU (2018) In British Journal of Surgery 105(1). p.86-95
Abstract

Background: The WHO and the World Bank ask countries to report the national volume of surgery. This report describes these data for Sweden, a high-income country. Methods: In an 8-year population-based observational cohort study, all inpatient and outpatient care in the public and private sectors was detected in the Swedish National Patient Register and screened for the occurrence of surgery. The entire Swedish population was eligible for inclusion. All patients attending healthcare for any disease were included. Incidence rates of surgery and likelihood of surgery were calculated, with trends over time, and correlation with sex, age and disease category. Results: Almost one in three hospitalizations involved a surgical procedure (30·6... (More)

Background: The WHO and the World Bank ask countries to report the national volume of surgery. This report describes these data for Sweden, a high-income country. Methods: In an 8-year population-based observational cohort study, all inpatient and outpatient care in the public and private sectors was detected in the Swedish National Patient Register and screened for the occurrence of surgery. The entire Swedish population was eligible for inclusion. All patients attending healthcare for any disease were included. Incidence rates of surgery and likelihood of surgery were calculated, with trends over time, and correlation with sex, age and disease category. Results: Almost one in three hospitalizations involved a surgical procedure (30·6 per cent). The incidence rate of surgery exceeded 17 480 operations per 100 000 person-years, and at least 58·5 per cent of all surgery was performed in an outpatient setting (range 58·5 to 71·6 per cent). Incidence rates of surgery increased every year by 5·2 (95 per cent c.i. 4·2 to 6·1) per cent (P < 0·001), predominantly owing to more outpatient surgery. Women had a 9·8 (95 per cent c.i. 5·6 to 14·0) per cent higher adjusted incidence rate of surgery than men (P < 0·001), mainly explained by more surgery during their fertile years. Incidence rates peaked in the elderly for both women and men, and varied between disease categories. Conclusion: Population requirements for surgery are greater than previously reported, and more than half of all surgery is performed in outpatient settings. Distributions of age, sex and disease influence estimates of population surgical demand, and should be accounted for in future global and national projections of surgical public health needs.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Surgery
volume
105
issue
1
pages
10 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:85033731532
ISSN
0007-1323
DOI
10.1002/bjs.10643
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9467155e-82b9-4db4-8141-7d2176e880ca
date added to LUP
2017-12-27 17:03:14
date last changed
2018-06-28 03:00:26
@article{9467155e-82b9-4db4-8141-7d2176e880ca,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: The WHO and the World Bank ask countries to report the national volume of surgery. This report describes these data for Sweden, a high-income country. Methods: In an 8-year population-based observational cohort study, all inpatient and outpatient care in the public and private sectors was detected in the Swedish National Patient Register and screened for the occurrence of surgery. The entire Swedish population was eligible for inclusion. All patients attending healthcare for any disease were included. Incidence rates of surgery and likelihood of surgery were calculated, with trends over time, and correlation with sex, age and disease category. Results: Almost one in three hospitalizations involved a surgical procedure (30·6 per cent). The incidence rate of surgery exceeded 17 480 operations per 100 000 person-years, and at least 58·5 per cent of all surgery was performed in an outpatient setting (range 58·5 to 71·6 per cent). Incidence rates of surgery increased every year by 5·2 (95 per cent c.i. 4·2 to 6·1) per cent (P &lt; 0·001), predominantly owing to more outpatient surgery. Women had a 9·8 (95 per cent c.i. 5·6 to 14·0) per cent higher adjusted incidence rate of surgery than men (P &lt; 0·001), mainly explained by more surgery during their fertile years. Incidence rates peaked in the elderly for both women and men, and varied between disease categories. Conclusion: Population requirements for surgery are greater than previously reported, and more than half of all surgery is performed in outpatient settings. Distributions of age, sex and disease influence estimates of population surgical demand, and should be accounted for in future global and national projections of surgical public health needs.</p>},
  author       = {Omling, E. and Jarnheimer, A. and Rose, J. and Björk, J. and Meara, J. G. and Hagander, L.},
  issn         = {0007-1323},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {86--95},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {British Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Population-based incidence rate of inpatient and outpatient surgical procedures in a high-income country},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bjs.10643},
  volume       = {105},
  year         = {2018},
}