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Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in a West African population of tuberculosis patients and unmatched healthy controls

Wejse, Christian; Olesen, Rikke; Rabna, Paulo; Kaestel, Pernille; Gustafson, Per LU ; Aaby, Peter; Andersen, Paul L.; Glerup, Henning and Sodemann, Morten (2007) In American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 86(5). p.1376-1383
Abstract
Background: Little is known regarding vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in African populations and in tuberculosis (TB) patients. VDD has been shown to be associated with TB. Objective: We aimed to compare the degree of vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) and VDD in TB patients and healthy adult controls in a West African population. Design: An unmatched case-control study was performed at a Demographic Surveillance Site in Guinea-Bissau. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 [25(OH)D-3] concentrations were measured in 362 TB patients and in 494 controls. Results: Hypovitammosis D [25(OH)D-3 <= 75 nmol/L] was more common in TB patients, but VDD [25(OH)D-3 <= 50 nmol/L] was more common and more severe in controls. We observed hypovitaminosis D in 467o... (More)
Background: Little is known regarding vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in African populations and in tuberculosis (TB) patients. VDD has been shown to be associated with TB. Objective: We aimed to compare the degree of vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) and VDD in TB patients and healthy adult controls in a West African population. Design: An unmatched case-control study was performed at a Demographic Surveillance Site in Guinea-Bissau. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 [25(OH)D-3] concentrations were measured in 362 TB patients and in 494 controls. Results: Hypovitammosis D [25(OH)D-3 <= 75 nmol/L] was more common in TB patients, but VDD [25(OH)D-3 <= 50 nmol/L] was more common and more severe in controls. We observed hypovitaminosis D in 467o (167/362) of the TB patients and in 39% (193/494) of the controls: the relative risk (RR) of hypovitaminosis D was 1.18 (95% Cl: 1.01. 1.38). VDD was observed in 8.5% (31/362) of the TB patients and in 13.2% (65/494) of the controls. The RR was 0.65 (95% Cl: 0.43,0.98), mainly because severe VDD [25(OH)D-3 <= 25 nmol/L] was observed in only I of 362 TB patients (0.2%) and in 24 of 494 controls (4.9%). After adjustment for background factors, hypovitaminosis D was not more frequent in TB patients than in healthy controls, but the mean serum 25(OH)D3 concentration remained lower. Conclusions: Hypovitammosis D was highly prevalent in TB patients and in healthy controls living at 12 degrees N; severe VDD was rare in TB patients. The finding indicates that the serum 25(OH)D3 concentration is associated with TB infection, but whether this role is a symptom or is causal was not established. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
25-hydroxyvitamin D, tuberculosis, hypovitaminosis D, Guinea-Bissau
in
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
volume
86
issue
5
pages
1376 - 1383
publisher
American Society for Clinical Nutrition
external identifiers
  • wos:000250936500018
  • scopus:36248982759
ISSN
1938-3207
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2509687d-ac57-40ab-9dab-d5a261e99897 (old id 972356)
alternative location
http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/86/5/1376
date added to LUP
2008-01-30 15:39:30
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:08:57
@article{2509687d-ac57-40ab-9dab-d5a261e99897,
  abstract     = {Background: Little is known regarding vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in African populations and in tuberculosis (TB) patients. VDD has been shown to be associated with TB. Objective: We aimed to compare the degree of vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) and VDD in TB patients and healthy adult controls in a West African population. Design: An unmatched case-control study was performed at a Demographic Surveillance Site in Guinea-Bissau. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 [25(OH)D-3] concentrations were measured in 362 TB patients and in 494 controls. Results: Hypovitammosis D [25(OH)D-3 &lt;= 75 nmol/L] was more common in TB patients, but VDD [25(OH)D-3 &lt;= 50 nmol/L] was more common and more severe in controls. We observed hypovitaminosis D in 467o (167/362) of the TB patients and in 39% (193/494) of the controls: the relative risk (RR) of hypovitaminosis D was 1.18 (95% Cl: 1.01. 1.38). VDD was observed in 8.5% (31/362) of the TB patients and in 13.2% (65/494) of the controls. The RR was 0.65 (95% Cl: 0.43,0.98), mainly because severe VDD [25(OH)D-3 &lt;= 25 nmol/L] was observed in only I of 362 TB patients (0.2%) and in 24 of 494 controls (4.9%). After adjustment for background factors, hypovitaminosis D was not more frequent in TB patients than in healthy controls, but the mean serum 25(OH)D3 concentration remained lower. Conclusions: Hypovitammosis D was highly prevalent in TB patients and in healthy controls living at 12 degrees N; severe VDD was rare in TB patients. The finding indicates that the serum 25(OH)D3 concentration is associated with TB infection, but whether this role is a symptom or is causal was not established.},
  author       = {Wejse, Christian and Olesen, Rikke and Rabna, Paulo and Kaestel, Pernille and Gustafson, Per and Aaby, Peter and Andersen, Paul L. and Glerup, Henning and Sodemann, Morten},
  issn         = {1938-3207},
  keyword      = {25-hydroxyvitamin D,tuberculosis,hypovitaminosis D,Guinea-Bissau},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1376--1383},
  publisher    = {American Society for Clinical Nutrition},
  series       = {American Journal of Clinical Nutrition},
  title        = {Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in a West African population of tuberculosis patients and unmatched healthy controls},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2007},
}