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Performance evaluation of complex fenestration systems

Hendrix, Anton; Arampatzis, Dimosthenis; Gentile, Niko LU ; Davidsson, Henrik LU and Poirazis, Harris LU (2017)
Abstract
It is known that shading systems often combined with solar control glasses are used to avoid glare and overheating at expenses of daylight. In Dynamic Thermal Modelling tools, there is no assessment method where the shading use is expressed when predicting the building performance. Furthermore, literature often refers to studies where complex fenestration systems are optimized for specific cases. However, there is a lack of a component-based tool to be used in the early-design phase by common practitioners, which breaches the gap and assesses the use of shading together with the building performance. In this perspective, an innovative tool was created to provide hints on how to assess the performance of fenestration systems in real life,... (More)
It is known that shading systems often combined with solar control glasses are used to avoid glare and overheating at expenses of daylight. In Dynamic Thermal Modelling tools, there is no assessment method where the shading use is expressed when predicting the building performance. Furthermore, literature often refers to studies where complex fenestration systems are optimized for specific cases. However, there is a lack of a component-based tool to be used in the early-design phase by common practitioners, which breaches the gap and assesses the use of shading together with the building performance. In this perspective, an innovative tool was created to provide hints on how to assess the performance of fenestration systems in real life, and help designers when choosing the glazing and shading control. As input, location information as well as hourly radiation data, and the basic window geometry are asked. Three different shading control strategies are used, namely a solar gains threshold, incident solar radiation, and a prediction on the user’s behaviour. Following, the tool assesses the solar gains and view to the outside per control strategy, and gives as an output the hourly shading use distribution and the View Quantity Index. Some important limitations that can be defined are: the simplification in the calculation of the secondary solar transmittance that is used for the solar heat gains; and the complexity of predicting the user’s behaviour, which is combined with the direct sun beam as glare factor. The study showed how this tool assesses the performance of different glazing products combined with shading control systems and strategies, to help designing a functioning façade that breaches the gap between shading systems and solar control. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
in press
subject
keywords
design tool, glazing, shading use, user predictability, solar gains, view, glare, comfort, energy saving, energy
host publication
Proceedings of the 12th Conference on Advanced Building Skins 2017
publisher
Advanced Building Skins GmbH
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
97932bdc-246f-4c64-94e3-3647abeb1681
date added to LUP
2017-09-25 09:30:57
date last changed
2018-11-21 21:34:44
@inproceedings{97932bdc-246f-4c64-94e3-3647abeb1681,
  abstract     = {It is known that shading systems often combined with solar control glasses are used to avoid glare and overheating at expenses of daylight. In Dynamic Thermal Modelling tools, there is no assessment method where the shading use is expressed when predicting the building performance. Furthermore, literature often refers to studies where complex fenestration systems are optimized for specific cases. However, there is a lack of a component-based tool to be used in the early-design phase by common practitioners, which breaches the gap and assesses the use of shading together with the building performance. In this perspective, an innovative tool was created to provide hints on how to assess the performance of fenestration systems in real life, and help designers when choosing the glazing and shading control. As input, location information as well as hourly radiation data, and the basic window geometry are asked. Three different shading control strategies are used, namely a solar gains threshold, incident solar radiation, and a prediction on the user’s behaviour. Following, the tool assesses the solar gains and view to the outside per control strategy, and gives as an output the hourly shading use distribution and the View Quantity Index. Some important limitations that can be defined are: the simplification in the calculation of the secondary solar transmittance that is used for the solar heat gains; and the complexity of predicting the user’s behaviour, which is combined with the direct sun beam as glare factor. The study showed how this tool assesses the performance of different glazing products combined with shading control systems and strategies, to help designing a functioning façade that breaches the gap between shading systems and solar control. },
  author       = {Hendrix, Anton and Arampatzis, Dimosthenis and Gentile, Niko and Davidsson, Henrik and Poirazis, Harris},
  keyword      = {design tool,glazing,shading use,user predictability,solar gains,view,glare,comfort,energy saving,energy},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  publisher    = {Advanced Building Skins GmbH},
  title        = {Performance evaluation of complex fenestration systems},
  year         = {2017},
}