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Strengthening the case for stimulus-specificity in artificial grammar learning: No evidence for abstract representations with extended exposure

Johansson, Tobias LU (2009) In Experimental Psychology 56(3). p.188-197
Abstract
Different theories have been proposed regarding the nature of the mental representations formed as a result of implicit learning of sequential regularities. Some theories postulate abstract surface-independent representations, while other theories postulate stimulus-specific representations. This article reports three experiments investigating the development of abstract representations in artificial grammar learning, using amethodological approach developed by Conway and Christiansen [Conway, C. M., & Christiansen, M. H. (2006). Statistical learning within and between modalities: Pitting abstract against stimulus-specific representations. Psychological Science, 17, 905-912.]. In all experiments, the number of blocks during the... (More)
Different theories have been proposed regarding the nature of the mental representations formed as a result of implicit learning of sequential regularities. Some theories postulate abstract surface-independent representations, while other theories postulate stimulus-specific representations. This article reports three experiments investigating the development of abstract representations in artificial grammar learning, using amethodological approach developed by Conway and Christiansen [Conway, C. M., & Christiansen, M. H. (2006). Statistical learning within and between modalities: Pitting abstract against stimulus-specific representations. Psychological Science, 17, 905-912.]. In all experiments, the number of blocks during the exposure phase was manipulated (6 blocks vs. 18 blocks of exposure to sequences). Experiment 1 and 2 investigated both visual and auditory learning where sequences were presented element-by-element. Experiment 3 investigated visual learning using a sequence-by-sequence presentation technique more commonly used in visual artificial grammar learning studies. Extending previous research (Conway & Christiansen, 2006) and in support of stimulus-specific accounts, the results of the experiments showed that extended observational learning results in increased stimulus-specific knowledge rather than abstraction towards surface-independent representations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
abstraction, implicit learning, stimulus-specificity, artificial grammar learning
in
Experimental Psychology
volume
56
issue
3
pages
188 - 197
publisher
Hogrefe & Huber Publishers
external identifiers
  • wos:000266939600006
  • scopus:64249100641
ISSN
2190-5142
DOI
10.1027/1618-3169.56.3.188
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3d792633-d576-4959-a1e0-4963e9ab2fa3 (old id 985885)
date added to LUP
2009-04-07 08:40:33
date last changed
2017-05-14 03:37:21
@article{3d792633-d576-4959-a1e0-4963e9ab2fa3,
  abstract     = {Different theories have been proposed regarding the nature of the mental representations formed as a result of implicit learning of sequential regularities. Some theories postulate abstract surface-independent representations, while other theories postulate stimulus-specific representations. This article reports three experiments investigating the development of abstract representations in artificial grammar learning, using amethodological approach developed by Conway and Christiansen [Conway, C. M., & Christiansen, M. H. (2006). Statistical learning within and between modalities: Pitting abstract against stimulus-specific representations. Psychological Science, 17, 905-912.]. In all experiments, the number of blocks during the exposure phase was manipulated (6 blocks vs. 18 blocks of exposure to sequences). Experiment 1 and 2 investigated both visual and auditory learning where sequences were presented element-by-element. Experiment 3 investigated visual learning using a sequence-by-sequence presentation technique more commonly used in visual artificial grammar learning studies. Extending previous research (Conway & Christiansen, 2006) and in support of stimulus-specific accounts, the results of the experiments showed that extended observational learning results in increased stimulus-specific knowledge rather than abstraction towards surface-independent representations.},
  author       = {Johansson, Tobias},
  issn         = {2190-5142},
  keyword      = {abstraction,implicit learning,stimulus-specificity,artificial grammar learning},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {188--197},
  publisher    = {Hogrefe & Huber Publishers},
  series       = {Experimental Psychology},
  title        = {Strengthening the case for stimulus-specificity in artificial grammar learning: No evidence for abstract representations with extended exposure},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1618-3169.56.3.188},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2009},
}