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Impact of the Swedish National Stroke Campaign on stroke awareness

Nordanstig, A.; Asplund, K; Norrving, B. LU ; Wahlgren, N.; Wester, P and Rosengren, L. (2017) In Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Abstract

Background: Time delay from stroke onset to arrival in hospital is an important obstacle to widespread reperfusion therapy. To increase knowledge about stroke, and potentially decrease this delay, a 27-month national public information campaign was carried out in Sweden. Aims: To assess the effects of a national stroke campaign in Sweden. Methods: The variables used to measure campaign effects were knowledge of the AKUT test [a Swedish equivalent of the FAST (Face-Arm-Speech-Time)] test and intent to call 112 (emergency telephone number) . Telephone interviews were carried out with 1500 randomly selected people in Sweden at eight points in time: before, three times during, immediately after, and nine, 13 and 21 months after the... (More)

Background: Time delay from stroke onset to arrival in hospital is an important obstacle to widespread reperfusion therapy. To increase knowledge about stroke, and potentially decrease this delay, a 27-month national public information campaign was carried out in Sweden. Aims: To assess the effects of a national stroke campaign in Sweden. Methods: The variables used to measure campaign effects were knowledge of the AKUT test [a Swedish equivalent of the FAST (Face-Arm-Speech-Time)] test and intent to call 112 (emergency telephone number) . Telephone interviews were carried out with 1500 randomly selected people in Sweden at eight points in time: before, three times during, immediately after, and nine, 13 and 21 months after the campaign. Results: Before the campaign, 4% could recall the meaning of some or all keywords in the AKUT test, compared with 23% during and directly after the campaign, and 14% 21 months later. Corresponding figures were 15%, 51%, and 50% for those remembering the term AKUT and 65%, 76%, and 73% for intent to call 112 when observing or experiencing stroke symptoms. During the course of the campaign, improvement of stroke knowledge was similar among men and women, but the absolute level of knowledge for both items was higher for women at all time points. Conclusion: The nationwide campaign substantially increased knowledge about the AKUT test and intention to call 112 when experiencing or observing stroke symptoms, but knowledge declined post-intervention. Repeated public information therefore appears essential to sustain knowledge gains.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Ambulance call, Emergency medical services, Knowledge, Public education, Stroke, Stroke campaign
in
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85019731417
ISSN
0001-6314
DOI
10.1111/ane.12777
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a25ae43c-9318-41d0-9245-96bb7ce9d092
date added to LUP
2017-06-26 14:02:08
date last changed
2017-06-26 14:02:08
@article{a25ae43c-9318-41d0-9245-96bb7ce9d092,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Time delay from stroke onset to arrival in hospital is an important obstacle to widespread reperfusion therapy. To increase knowledge about stroke, and potentially decrease this delay, a 27-month national public information campaign was carried out in Sweden. Aims: To assess the effects of a national stroke campaign in Sweden. Methods: The variables used to measure campaign effects were knowledge of the AKUT test [a Swedish equivalent of the FAST (Face-Arm-Speech-Time)] test and intent to call 112 (emergency telephone number) . Telephone interviews were carried out with 1500 randomly selected people in Sweden at eight points in time: before, three times during, immediately after, and nine, 13 and 21 months after the campaign. Results: Before the campaign, 4% could recall the meaning of some or all keywords in the AKUT test, compared with 23% during and directly after the campaign, and 14% 21 months later. Corresponding figures were 15%, 51%, and 50% for those remembering the term AKUT and 65%, 76%, and 73% for intent to call 112 when observing or experiencing stroke symptoms. During the course of the campaign, improvement of stroke knowledge was similar among men and women, but the absolute level of knowledge for both items was higher for women at all time points. Conclusion: The nationwide campaign substantially increased knowledge about the AKUT test and intention to call 112 when experiencing or observing stroke symptoms, but knowledge declined post-intervention. Repeated public information therefore appears essential to sustain knowledge gains.</p>},
  author       = {Nordanstig, A. and Asplund, K and Norrving, B. and Wahlgren, N. and Wester, P and Rosengren, L.},
  issn         = {0001-6314},
  keyword      = {Ambulance call,Emergency medical services,Knowledge,Public education,Stroke,Stroke campaign},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Neurologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Impact of the Swedish National Stroke Campaign on stroke awareness},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ane.12777},
  year         = {2017},
}