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Hobbit: Providing Fall Detection and Prevention for the Elderly in the Real World

Bajones, Markus; Fischinger, David; Weiss, Astrid; Wolf, Daniel; Vincze, Markus; de la Puente, Paloma; Körtner, Tobias; Weninger, Markus; Papoutsakis, Konstantinos and Michel, Damien, et al. (2018) In Journal of Robotics 2018.
Abstract
We present the robot developed within the Hobbit project, a socially assistive service robot aiming at the challenge of enabling prolonged independent living of elderly people in their own homes. We present the second prototype (Hobbit PT2) in terms of hardware and functionality improvements following first user studies. Our main contribution lies within the description of all components developed within the Hobbit project, leading to autonomous operation of 371 days during field trials in Austria, Greece, and Sweden. In these field trials, we studied how 18 elderly users (aged 75 years and older) lived with the autonomously interacting service robot over multiple weeks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a... (More)
We present the robot developed within the Hobbit project, a socially assistive service robot aiming at the challenge of enabling prolonged independent living of elderly people in their own homes. We present the second prototype (Hobbit PT2) in terms of hardware and functionality improvements following first user studies. Our main contribution lies within the description of all components developed within the Hobbit project, leading to autonomous operation of 371 days during field trials in Austria, Greece, and Sweden. In these field trials, we studied how 18 elderly users (aged 75 years and older) lived with the autonomously interacting service robot over multiple weeks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a multifunctional, low-cost service robot equipped with a manipulator was studied and evaluated for several weeks under real-world conditions. We show that Hobbit’s adaptive approach towards the user increasingly eased the interaction between the users and Hobbit. We provide lessons learned regarding the need for adaptive behavior coordination, support during emergency situations, and clear communication of robotic actions and their consequences for fellow researchers who are developing an autonomous, low-cost service robot designed to interact with their users in domestic contexts. Our trials show the necessity to move out into actual user homes, as only there can we encounter issues such as misinterpretation of actions during unscripted human-robot interaction. (Less)
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publication status
published
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Journal of Robotics
volume
2018
pages
20 pages
publisher
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
external identifiers
  • scopus:85055807406
ISSN
1687-9619
DOI
10.1155/2018/1754657
language
English
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yes
id
a3ed9b22-adb4-4a6f-a3fb-94b23c38b2ae
date added to LUP
2018-06-27 17:01:22
date last changed
2019-06-19 03:57:38
@article{a3ed9b22-adb4-4a6f-a3fb-94b23c38b2ae,
  abstract     = {We present the robot developed within the Hobbit project, a socially assistive service robot aiming at the challenge of enabling prolonged independent living of elderly people in their own homes. We present the second prototype (Hobbit PT2) in terms of hardware and functionality improvements following first user studies. Our main contribution lies within the description of all components developed within the Hobbit project, leading to autonomous operation of 371 days during field trials in Austria, Greece, and Sweden. In these field trials, we studied how 18 elderly users (aged 75 years and older) lived with the autonomously interacting service robot over multiple weeks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a multifunctional, low-cost service robot equipped with a manipulator was studied and evaluated for several weeks under real-world conditions. We show that Hobbit’s adaptive approach towards the user increasingly eased the interaction between the users and Hobbit. We provide lessons learned regarding the need for adaptive behavior coordination, support during emergency situations, and clear communication of robotic actions and their consequences for fellow researchers who are developing an autonomous, low-cost service robot designed to interact with their users in domestic contexts. Our trials show the necessity to move out into actual user homes, as only there can we encounter issues such as misinterpretation of actions during unscripted human-robot interaction.},
  articleno    = {1754657},
  author       = {Bajones, Markus and Fischinger, David and Weiss, Astrid and Wolf, Daniel and Vincze, Markus and de la Puente, Paloma and Körtner, Tobias and Weninger, Markus and Papoutsakis, Konstantinos and Michel, Damien and Qammaz, Ammar and Panteleris, Paschalis and Foukarakis, Michalis and Adami, Ilia and Ioannidi, Danai and Leonidis, Asterios and Antona, Margherita and Argyros, Antonis and Mayer, Peter and Panek, Paul and Eftring, Håkan and Frennert, Susanne},
  issn         = {1687-9619},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  pages        = {20},
  publisher    = {Hindawi Publishing Corporation},
  series       = {Journal of Robotics},
  title        = {Hobbit: Providing Fall Detection and Prevention for the Elderly in the Real World},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/1754657},
  volume       = {2018},
  year         = {2018},
}