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Phenological diversity provides opportunities for climate change adaptation in winegrapes

Wolkovich, E. M.; Burge, D. O.; Walker, Marilyn A. and Nicholas, K. A. LU (2017) In Journal of Ecology 105(4). p.905-912
Abstract

Climate change poses an unprecedented challenge to agriculture. While growers have always struggled with year-to-year variation in climate – early rains or unusually hot summers – climate change provides a major directional shift in mean climate. Across the globe, growing regions are warming and plants are shifting in both time and space. Current and future shifts pose a major challenge to researchers and growers alike, yet they also highlight a major avenue to adapt crops to climate change – by understanding and exploiting phenological diversity. Using winegrapes (Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera) as a case study, we review the phenological diversity present within one crop and its underlying environmental and genetic drivers. In... (More)

Climate change poses an unprecedented challenge to agriculture. While growers have always struggled with year-to-year variation in climate – early rains or unusually hot summers – climate change provides a major directional shift in mean climate. Across the globe, growing regions are warming and plants are shifting in both time and space. Current and future shifts pose a major challenge to researchers and growers alike, yet they also highlight a major avenue to adapt crops to climate change – by understanding and exploiting phenological diversity. Using winegrapes (Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera) as a case study, we review the phenological diversity present within one crop and its underlying environmental and genetic drivers. In winegrapes, harvest dates are strongly tied to temperature, but this sensitivity varies greatly, with different cultivars (or ‘varieties’) of grapes ripening much more or less for the same amount of warming. Synthesis. This phenological diversity provides a mechanism to help growers adapt winegrapes to shifting climates – by planting different varieties that will grow well under current and future climate regimes. More generally, understanding phenological diversity – including its environmental vs. genetic components – offers a major avenue to use ecological knowledge to advance adaptation for winegrapes, and many other crops, to climate change.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
common garden, crop, genotype × environment interaction, phenology, temperature response, Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera
in
Journal of Ecology
volume
105
issue
4
pages
8 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85020853957
  • wos:000403549500008
ISSN
0022-0477
DOI
10.1111/1365-2745.12786
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a505e4a9-8d25-460f-8b8e-5ca0542d0b17
date added to LUP
2017-07-04 08:08:22
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:37:34
@article{a505e4a9-8d25-460f-8b8e-5ca0542d0b17,
  abstract     = {<p>Climate change poses an unprecedented challenge to agriculture. While growers have always struggled with year-to-year variation in climate – early rains or unusually hot summers – climate change provides a major directional shift in mean climate. Across the globe, growing regions are warming and plants are shifting in both time and space. Current and future shifts pose a major challenge to researchers and growers alike, yet they also highlight a major avenue to adapt crops to climate change – by understanding and exploiting phenological diversity. Using winegrapes (Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera) as a case study, we review the phenological diversity present within one crop and its underlying environmental and genetic drivers. In winegrapes, harvest dates are strongly tied to temperature, but this sensitivity varies greatly, with different cultivars (or ‘varieties’) of grapes ripening much more or less for the same amount of warming. Synthesis. This phenological diversity provides a mechanism to help growers adapt winegrapes to shifting climates – by planting different varieties that will grow well under current and future climate regimes. More generally, understanding phenological diversity – including its environmental vs. genetic components – offers a major avenue to use ecological knowledge to advance adaptation for winegrapes, and many other crops, to climate change.</p>},
  author       = {Wolkovich, E. M. and Burge, D. O. and Walker, Marilyn A. and Nicholas, K. A.},
  issn         = {0022-0477},
  keyword      = {common garden,crop,genotype × environment interaction,phenology,temperature response,Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {905--912},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Ecology},
  title        = {Phenological diversity provides opportunities for climate change adaptation in winegrapes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12786},
  volume       = {105},
  year         = {2017},
}