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Nutrient intakes independently affect growth in extremely preterm infants: results from a population-based study

Sjostrom, Elisabeth Stoltz ; Ohlund, Inger ; Ahlsson, Fredrik ; Engstrom, Eva ; Fellman, Vineta LU ; Hellstrom, Ann ; Källén, Karin LU ; Norman, Mikael ; Olhager, Elisabeth and Serenius, Fredrik , et al. (2013) In Acta Pædiatrica 102(11). p.1067-1074
Abstract
AimTo explore associations between energy and macronutrient intakes and early growth in extremely low gestational age (ELGA) infants. MethodsRetrospective population-based study of all ELGA infants (<27weeks) born in Sweden during 2004-2007. Detailed data on nutrition and anthropometric measurements from birth to 70days of postnatal age were retrieved from hospital records. ResultsStudy infants (n=531) had a meanSD gestational age of 25.3 +/- 1.1weeks and a birth weight of 765 +/- 170g. Between 0 and 70days, average daily energy and protein intakes were 120 +/- 11kcal/kg and 3.2 +/- 0.4g/kg, respectively. During this period, standard deviation scores for weight, length and head circumference decreased by 1.4, 2.3 and 0.7, respectively.... (More)
AimTo explore associations between energy and macronutrient intakes and early growth in extremely low gestational age (ELGA) infants. MethodsRetrospective population-based study of all ELGA infants (<27weeks) born in Sweden during 2004-2007. Detailed data on nutrition and anthropometric measurements from birth to 70days of postnatal age were retrieved from hospital records. ResultsStudy infants (n=531) had a meanSD gestational age of 25.3 +/- 1.1weeks and a birth weight of 765 +/- 170g. Between 0 and 70days, average daily energy and protein intakes were 120 +/- 11kcal/kg and 3.2 +/- 0.4g/kg, respectively. During this period, standard deviation scores for weight, length and head circumference decreased by 1.4, 2.3 and 0.7, respectively. Taking gestational age, baseline anthropometrics and severity of illness into account, lower energy intake correlated with lower gain in weight (r=+0.315, p<0.001), length (r=+0.215, p<0.001) and head circumference (r=+0.218, p<0.001). Protein intake predicted growth in all anthropometric outcomes, and fat intake was positively associated with head circumference growth. ConclusionExtremely low gestational age infants received considerably less energy and protein than recommended and showed postnatal growth failure. Nutrient intakes were independent predictors of growth even after adjusting for severity of illness. These findings suggest that optimized energy and macronutrient intakes may prevent early growth failure in these infants. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Energy intake, Extremely preterm infants, Growth failure, Nutrient, intake, Protein
in
Acta Pædiatrica
volume
102
issue
11
pages
1067 - 1074
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000325265500021
  • scopus:84885377875
  • pmid:23855971
ISSN
1651-2227
DOI
10.1111/apa.12359
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a8681cf2-9987-463d-a346-11f5617c2c69 (old id 4171757)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 13:43:30
date last changed
2019-11-05 02:37:37
@article{a8681cf2-9987-463d-a346-11f5617c2c69,
  abstract     = {AimTo explore associations between energy and macronutrient intakes and early growth in extremely low gestational age (ELGA) infants. MethodsRetrospective population-based study of all ELGA infants (&lt;27weeks) born in Sweden during 2004-2007. Detailed data on nutrition and anthropometric measurements from birth to 70days of postnatal age were retrieved from hospital records. ResultsStudy infants (n=531) had a meanSD gestational age of 25.3 +/- 1.1weeks and a birth weight of 765 +/- 170g. Between 0 and 70days, average daily energy and protein intakes were 120 +/- 11kcal/kg and 3.2 +/- 0.4g/kg, respectively. During this period, standard deviation scores for weight, length and head circumference decreased by 1.4, 2.3 and 0.7, respectively. Taking gestational age, baseline anthropometrics and severity of illness into account, lower energy intake correlated with lower gain in weight (r=+0.315, p&lt;0.001), length (r=+0.215, p&lt;0.001) and head circumference (r=+0.218, p&lt;0.001). Protein intake predicted growth in all anthropometric outcomes, and fat intake was positively associated with head circumference growth. ConclusionExtremely low gestational age infants received considerably less energy and protein than recommended and showed postnatal growth failure. Nutrient intakes were independent predictors of growth even after adjusting for severity of illness. These findings suggest that optimized energy and macronutrient intakes may prevent early growth failure in these infants.},
  author       = {Sjostrom, Elisabeth Stoltz and Ohlund, Inger and Ahlsson, Fredrik and Engstrom, Eva and Fellman, Vineta and Hellstrom, Ann and Källén, Karin and Norman, Mikael and Olhager, Elisabeth and Serenius, Fredrik and Domellof, Magnus},
  issn         = {1651-2227},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1067--1074},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta Pædiatrica},
  title        = {Nutrient intakes independently affect growth in extremely preterm infants: results from a population-based study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.12359},
  doi          = {10.1111/apa.12359},
  volume       = {102},
  year         = {2013},
}