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Post-saccadic oscillations in eye movement data recorded with pupil-based eye trackers reflect motion of the pupil inside the iris

Nyström, Marcus LU ; Hooge, Ignace and Holmqvist, Kenneth LU (2013) In Vision Research 92. p.59-66
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

Current video eye trackers use information about the pupil center to estimate orientation and movement of the eye. While dual Purkinje eye trackers suffer from lens wobble and scleral search coils may be influenced by contact lens slippage directly after saccades, it is not known whether pupil-based eye trackers produces similar artifacts in the data. We recorded eye movements from participants making repetitive, horizontal saccades and compared the movement in the data with pupil- and iris movements extracted from the eye images. Results showed that post-saccadic instabilities clearly exist in data recorded with a pupil-based eye tracker. They also exhibit a high degree of reproducibility across... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

Current video eye trackers use information about the pupil center to estimate orientation and movement of the eye. While dual Purkinje eye trackers suffer from lens wobble and scleral search coils may be influenced by contact lens slippage directly after saccades, it is not known whether pupil-based eye trackers produces similar artifacts in the data. We recorded eye movements from participants making repetitive, horizontal saccades and compared the movement in the data with pupil- and iris movements extracted from the eye images. Results showed that post-saccadic instabilities clearly exist in data recorded with a pupil-based eye tracker. They also exhibit a high degree of reproducibility across saccades and within participants. While the recorded eye movement data correlated well with the movement of the pupil center, the iris center showed only little post-saccadic movement. This means that the pupil moves relative to the iris during post-saccadic eye movements, and that the eye movement data reflect pupil movement rather than eyeball rotation. Besides introducing inaccuracies and additional variability in the data, the pupil movement inside the eyeball influences the decision of when a saccade should end and the subsequent fixation should begin, and consequently higher order analyses based on fixations and saccades. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Vision Research
volume
92
pages
59 - 66
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000326140400009
  • pmid:24096093
  • scopus:84885777280
ISSN
1878-5646
DOI
10.1016/j.visres.2013.09.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a9c0b0ad-610b-463a-ac56-63abe77e735c (old id 4058127)
date added to LUP
2013-09-25 15:36:04
date last changed
2019-09-17 01:36:49
@article{a9c0b0ad-610b-463a-ac56-63abe77e735c,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
Current video eye trackers use information about the pupil center to estimate orientation and movement of the eye. While dual Purkinje eye trackers suffer from lens wobble and scleral search coils may be influenced by contact lens slippage directly after saccades, it is not known whether pupil-based eye trackers produces similar artifacts in the data. We recorded eye movements from participants making repetitive, horizontal saccades and compared the movement in the data with pupil- and iris movements extracted from the eye images. Results showed that post-saccadic instabilities clearly exist in data recorded with a pupil-based eye tracker. They also exhibit a high degree of reproducibility across saccades and within participants. While the recorded eye movement data correlated well with the movement of the pupil center, the iris center showed only little post-saccadic movement. This means that the pupil moves relative to the iris during post-saccadic eye movements, and that the eye movement data reflect pupil movement rather than eyeball rotation. Besides introducing inaccuracies and additional variability in the data, the pupil movement inside the eyeball influences the decision of when a saccade should end and the subsequent fixation should begin, and consequently higher order analyses based on fixations and saccades.},
  author       = {Nyström, Marcus and Hooge, Ignace and Holmqvist, Kenneth},
  issn         = {1878-5646},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {59--66},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Vision Research},
  title        = {Post-saccadic oscillations in eye movement data recorded with pupil-based eye trackers reflect motion of the pupil inside the iris},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2013.09.009},
  volume       = {92},
  year         = {2013},
}