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Survival in bladder and renal cell cancers is familial

Ji, Jianguang LU ; Försti, Asta LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Lenner, Per and Hemminki, Kari LU (2008) In Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN 19(5). p.91-985
Abstract

Having family members with cancer has been associated with increased risk for bladder and renal cell cancers, but its association with survival has not been examined. This study was an analysis of the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database and revealed that survival for bladder and renal cell cancers was similar whether the cancer was familial or sporadic; however, when survival in offspring was analyzed according to the affected parents' length of survival, prognosis was concordant. Cox proportional hazard regression models revealed that for bladder cancer, the risk for death among offspring whose parents survived > or =5 yr was approximately one third that of offspring whose parents survived <5 yr, after adjustment for... (More)

Having family members with cancer has been associated with increased risk for bladder and renal cell cancers, but its association with survival has not been examined. This study was an analysis of the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database and revealed that survival for bladder and renal cell cancers was similar whether the cancer was familial or sporadic; however, when survival in offspring was analyzed according to the affected parents' length of survival, prognosis was concordant. Cox proportional hazard regression models revealed that for bladder cancer, the risk for death among offspring whose parents survived > or =5 yr was approximately one third that of offspring whose parents survived <5 yr, after adjustment for gender, age at diagnosis, time period of diagnosis, socioeconomic status, and geographic region (adjusted hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.15 to 0.80, for overall mortality). A risk of similar magnitude was found for renal cell cancer (adjusted hazard ratio 0.38; 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 0.87, for overall mortality). These population-level findings suggest heritability of prognosis for bladder and renal cell cancers. Genetic factors likely contribute to the mechanism underlying this observation.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Adult, Carcinoma, Renal Cell/genetics, Cause of Death, Databases, Factual, Family, Family Health, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease/epidemiology, Humans, Incidence, Kidney Neoplasms/genetics, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Sweden/epidemiology, Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/genetics
in
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN
volume
19
issue
5
pages
7 pages
publisher
American Society of Nephrology
external identifiers
  • scopus:44049103194
ISSN
1046-6673
DOI
10.1681/ASN.2007070818
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
a9e06b76-a408-4663-97c8-5c110aa9e621
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 10:52:07
date last changed
2019-03-12 04:20:20
@article{a9e06b76-a408-4663-97c8-5c110aa9e621,
  abstract     = {<p>Having family members with cancer has been associated with increased risk for bladder and renal cell cancers, but its association with survival has not been examined. This study was an analysis of the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database and revealed that survival for bladder and renal cell cancers was similar whether the cancer was familial or sporadic; however, when survival in offspring was analyzed according to the affected parents' length of survival, prognosis was concordant. Cox proportional hazard regression models revealed that for bladder cancer, the risk for death among offspring whose parents survived &gt; or =5 yr was approximately one third that of offspring whose parents survived &lt;5 yr, after adjustment for gender, age at diagnosis, time period of diagnosis, socioeconomic status, and geographic region (adjusted hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.15 to 0.80, for overall mortality). A risk of similar magnitude was found for renal cell cancer (adjusted hazard ratio 0.38; 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 0.87, for overall mortality). These population-level findings suggest heritability of prognosis for bladder and renal cell cancers. Genetic factors likely contribute to the mechanism underlying this observation.</p>},
  author       = {Ji, Jianguang and Försti, Asta and Sundquist, Jan and Lenner, Per and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1046-6673},
  keyword      = {Adult,Carcinoma, Renal Cell/genetics,Cause of Death,Databases, Factual,Family,Family Health,Female,Genetic Predisposition to Disease/epidemiology,Humans,Incidence,Kidney Neoplasms/genetics,Male,Middle Aged,Prognosis,Risk Factors,Sweden/epidemiology,Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/genetics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {91--985},
  publisher    = {American Society of Nephrology},
  series       = {Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN},
  title        = {Survival in bladder and renal cell cancers is familial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2007070818},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2008},
}