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Contact allergy in atopic individuals in relation to allergen-specific immunotherapy

Siemund, Ingrid LU ; Hindsén, Monica LU ; Netterlid, Eva LU ; Güner, Nuray and Bruze, Magnus LU (2016) In European Journal of Dermatology 26(3). p.271-280
Abstract

Background: Type I sensitizations and atopic dermatitis (AD) often appear in the same patient. Beneficial effects of allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) in patients with bothADand type I allergies have been reported. The predisposing role of AD to the development of type IV sensitization is discussed. Whether ASIT for type I allergy also influences type IV allergies is unknown. Objectives: To compare the number of contact allergies between patients with and without AD, before and after one year’s treatment with ASIT. Materials and Methods: A controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children/adults with allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis, treated or untreated with ASIT, was performed. The history of AD was collected using... (More)

Background: Type I sensitizations and atopic dermatitis (AD) often appear in the same patient. Beneficial effects of allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) in patients with bothADand type I allergies have been reported. The predisposing role of AD to the development of type IV sensitization is discussed. Whether ASIT for type I allergy also influences type IV allergies is unknown. Objectives: To compare the number of contact allergies between patients with and without AD, before and after one year’s treatment with ASIT. Materials and Methods: A controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children/adults with allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis, treated or untreated with ASIT, was performed. The history of AD was collected using questionnaires. The number of contact allergies was assessed by patch testing with a baseline series. Results: 205 individuals completed the study; 133 treated with ASIT (exposed) and 72 before starting ASIT (unexposed). For participants with AD, significantly more contact allergies were found in the groups of all children (p = 0.002), all exposed children (p<0.001), and all exposed study persons (p = 0.013). Independent of AD, significantly more contact allergies were noted in the groups of all unexposed adults (p = 0.004) and all unexposed study persons (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The higher number of contact allergies in patients with AD indicates that AD may be a risk factor for type IV sensitization in those with allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis. The lower number of contact allergies in patients exposed to ASIT suggests an immunomodulatory effect on type IV sensitization.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Allergen-specific immunotherapy, Allergic contact dermatitis, Atopic eczema, Cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity, Patch testing, Type I sensitization
in
European Journal of Dermatology
volume
26
issue
3
pages
10 pages
publisher
John Libbey Eurotext
external identifiers
  • scopus:85006094923
  • wos:000378782900008
ISSN
1167-1122
DOI
10.1684/ejd.2016.2765
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b0650ed7-9304-4b2b-b680-16c8894d59bc
date added to LUP
2016-12-30 10:12:05
date last changed
2017-11-13 18:19:47
@article{b0650ed7-9304-4b2b-b680-16c8894d59bc,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Type I sensitizations and atopic dermatitis (AD) often appear in the same patient. Beneficial effects of allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) in patients with bothADand type I allergies have been reported. The predisposing role of AD to the development of type IV sensitization is discussed. Whether ASIT for type I allergy also influences type IV allergies is unknown. Objectives: To compare the number of contact allergies between patients with and without AD, before and after one year’s treatment with ASIT. Materials and Methods: A controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children/adults with allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis, treated or untreated with ASIT, was performed. The history of AD was collected using questionnaires. The number of contact allergies was assessed by patch testing with a baseline series. Results: 205 individuals completed the study; 133 treated with ASIT (exposed) and 72 before starting ASIT (unexposed). For participants with AD, significantly more contact allergies were found in the groups of all children (p = 0.002), all exposed children (p&lt;0.001), and all exposed study persons (p = 0.013). Independent of AD, significantly more contact allergies were noted in the groups of all unexposed adults (p = 0.004) and all unexposed study persons (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The higher number of contact allergies in patients with AD indicates that AD may be a risk factor for type IV sensitization in those with allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis. The lower number of contact allergies in patients exposed to ASIT suggests an immunomodulatory effect on type IV sensitization.</p>},
  author       = {Siemund, Ingrid and Hindsén, Monica and Netterlid, Eva and Güner, Nuray and Bruze, Magnus},
  issn         = {1167-1122},
  keyword      = {Allergen-specific immunotherapy,Allergic contact dermatitis,Atopic eczema,Cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity,Patch testing,Type I sensitization},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {271--280},
  publisher    = {John Libbey Eurotext},
  series       = {European Journal of Dermatology},
  title        = {Contact allergy in atopic individuals in relation to allergen-specific immunotherapy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/ejd.2016.2765},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2016},
}