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Object Shift and Event-Related Brain Potentials.

Roll, Mikael LU ; Horne, Merle LU and Lindgren, Magnus LU (2007) In Journal of Neurolinguistics 20(6). p.462-481
Abstract
Object Shift in Swedish is restricted to unstressed pronouns. Sentences where an object pronoun precedes a sentence adverb, such as Han åt den inte ‘(lit.) He ate it not’, are thus well-formed, whereas sentences with a full noun phrase (NP) object preceding a sentence adverb, such as Han åt sylt/sylten inte ‘(lit.) He ate jam/the jam not’, are ill-formed. The neural correlates to violation of this word category restriction were explored using Event-Related Potentials. In the indefinite full NP object condition, there was a posterior negative deflection appearing 200–400 ms after the detection point of the grammatical anomaly, suggesting increased semantic integration cost. It was marginally larger than in the definite condition. A P600... (More)
Object Shift in Swedish is restricted to unstressed pronouns. Sentences where an object pronoun precedes a sentence adverb, such as Han åt den inte ‘(lit.) He ate it not’, are thus well-formed, whereas sentences with a full noun phrase (NP) object preceding a sentence adverb, such as Han åt sylt/sylten inte ‘(lit.) He ate jam/the jam not’, are ill-formed. The neural correlates to violation of this word category restriction were explored using Event-Related Potentials. In the indefinite full NP object condition, there was a posterior negative deflection appearing 200–400 ms after the detection point of the grammatical anomaly, suggesting increased semantic integration cost. It was marginally larger than in the definite condition. A P600 followed the negativity in both full NP object conditions. Furthermore, a subsequent effect, interpreted as a left anterior negativity (LAN), was significant in the indefinite full NP object condition. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
N400, object shift, P600, LAN, event-related potentials, Swedish
in
Journal of Neurolinguistics
volume
20
issue
6
pages
462 - 481
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000251115000003
  • scopus:34948859464
ISSN
0911-6044
DOI
10.1016/j.jneuroling.2007.04.001
project
Grammar, Prosody, Discourse and the Brain. ERP-studies in speech processing
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b1f90f9f-4bdc-40d0-ba35-06bf27e5f178 (old id 722051)
date added to LUP
2007-12-11 09:55:20
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:01:40
@article{b1f90f9f-4bdc-40d0-ba35-06bf27e5f178,
  abstract     = {Object Shift in Swedish is restricted to unstressed pronouns. Sentences where an object pronoun precedes a sentence adverb, such as Han åt den inte ‘(lit.) He ate it not’, are thus well-formed, whereas sentences with a full noun phrase (NP) object preceding a sentence adverb, such as Han åt sylt/sylten inte ‘(lit.) He ate jam/the jam not’, are ill-formed. The neural correlates to violation of this word category restriction were explored using Event-Related Potentials. In the indefinite full NP object condition, there was a posterior negative deflection appearing 200–400 ms after the detection point of the grammatical anomaly, suggesting increased semantic integration cost. It was marginally larger than in the definite condition. A P600 followed the negativity in both full NP object conditions. Furthermore, a subsequent effect, interpreted as a left anterior negativity (LAN), was significant in the indefinite full NP object condition.},
  author       = {Roll, Mikael and Horne, Merle and Lindgren, Magnus},
  issn         = {0911-6044},
  keyword      = {N400,object shift,P600,LAN,event-related potentials,Swedish},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {462--481},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Neurolinguistics},
  title        = {Object Shift and Event-Related Brain Potentials.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneuroling.2007.04.001},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2007},
}