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Pain and fractures are independently related to lower walking speed and grip strength: Results from the population study "Good Ageing in Skåne".

Ekström, Henrik LU and Elmståhl, Sölve LU (2006) In Acta Orthopaedica 77(6). p.902-911
Abstract
Background Earlier reports on reduced physical performance and osteoporosis-related fractures have mostly been short-term studies. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of fractures on physical functioning 3 years after trauma, the latter being stratified for pain. Participants and methods The study consisted of a population-based case-control study including 289 subjects from the "Good Ageing in Skane" project. Men and women with fractures, aged 60-93 years, were divided into one group with pain (FP, n = 71) and one without pain (FnP, n = 53). Fractures included vertebrae, hip, pelvis or ankle according to the national medical register. A third group of subjects without fractures or pain (CnP, n = 165) was used as... (More)
Background Earlier reports on reduced physical performance and osteoporosis-related fractures have mostly been short-term studies. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of fractures on physical functioning 3 years after trauma, the latter being stratified for pain. Participants and methods The study consisted of a population-based case-control study including 289 subjects from the "Good Ageing in Skane" project. Men and women with fractures, aged 60-93 years, were divided into one group with pain (FP, n = 71) and one without pain (FnP, n = 53). Fractures included vertebrae, hip, pelvis or ankle according to the national medical register. A third group of subjects without fractures or pain (CnP, n = 165) was used as control. Pain during the previous month, health variables, lifestyle, medication, use of a walking aid, and sociodemographic variables were self-reported. Walking 15 m, 2 x 15 m, and timed get-up-and-go (TUG)-all at self-selected and maximum speed-and maximum handgrip strength were assessed objectively. Results Among the FP patients, almost half of the group suffered pain on a daily basis. The subjects in the CnP and FnP groups performed significantly better than the FP patient group in all functional tests. Median time for walking a distance of 15 m at self-selected speed was 16, 13 and 12 sec for the CnP, FnP and FP groups, respectively. Both fracture and pain independently explained lower walking speed (self-selected and maximum) as well as TUG, adjusted for age, sex and co-morbidity in a multiple regression model. Those who had sustained fractures more than 3 years previously performed significantly better in walking 15 m and 2 x 15 in at both self-elected and maximum speed than those with a more recent fracture, irrespective of pain. Interpretation After 3 years, patients who had sustained a fracture but who experienced no pain performed almost as well as control subjects. Pain and fracture were independently influenced by physical function. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Orthopaedica
volume
77
issue
6
pages
902 - 911
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000243586300011
  • scopus:33846916505
ISSN
1745-3682
DOI
10.1080/17453670610013204
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b1f99b37-9f3f-41c1-b28a-0aff4ad5d1c8 (old id 164577)
date added to LUP
2007-07-20 14:44:10
date last changed
2019-02-10 04:22:26
@article{b1f99b37-9f3f-41c1-b28a-0aff4ad5d1c8,
  abstract     = {Background Earlier reports on reduced physical performance and osteoporosis-related fractures have mostly been short-term studies. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of fractures on physical functioning 3 years after trauma, the latter being stratified for pain. Participants and methods The study consisted of a population-based case-control study including 289 subjects from the "Good Ageing in Skane" project. Men and women with fractures, aged 60-93 years, were divided into one group with pain (FP, n = 71) and one without pain (FnP, n = 53). Fractures included vertebrae, hip, pelvis or ankle according to the national medical register. A third group of subjects without fractures or pain (CnP, n = 165) was used as control. Pain during the previous month, health variables, lifestyle, medication, use of a walking aid, and sociodemographic variables were self-reported. Walking 15 m, 2 x 15 m, and timed get-up-and-go (TUG)-all at self-selected and maximum speed-and maximum handgrip strength were assessed objectively. Results Among the FP patients, almost half of the group suffered pain on a daily basis. The subjects in the CnP and FnP groups performed significantly better than the FP patient group in all functional tests. Median time for walking a distance of 15 m at self-selected speed was 16, 13 and 12 sec for the CnP, FnP and FP groups, respectively. Both fracture and pain independently explained lower walking speed (self-selected and maximum) as well as TUG, adjusted for age, sex and co-morbidity in a multiple regression model. Those who had sustained fractures more than 3 years previously performed significantly better in walking 15 m and 2 x 15 in at both self-elected and maximum speed than those with a more recent fracture, irrespective of pain. Interpretation After 3 years, patients who had sustained a fracture but who experienced no pain performed almost as well as control subjects. Pain and fracture were independently influenced by physical function.},
  author       = {Ekström, Henrik and Elmståhl, Sölve},
  issn         = {1745-3682},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {902--911},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Orthopaedica},
  title        = {Pain and fractures are independently related to lower walking speed and grip strength: Results from the population study "Good Ageing in Skåne".},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17453670610013204},
  volume       = {77},
  year         = {2006},
}