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Disability and Pain are the Best Predictors of Sick Leave After a Distal Radius Fracture in Men

Egund, Lisa LU ; Önnby, Karin LU ; Mcguigan, Fiona LU and Åkesson, Kristina LU (2020) In Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Abstract

Purpose Distal radius fracture often compromises working ability, but clinical implications are less studied in men due to its lower incidence. This study therefore describes sick leave in men with distal radius fracture, specifically exploring the impact of patient- and fracture-related factors. Methods Professionally active men aged 20–65 with distal radius fracture were followed prospectively for 1-year (n = 88). Data included treatment method, radiographic parameters pre/post treatment, complications, health, lifestyle and occupational demand. Patient outcomes were self-reported sick leave; Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score; pain (5 likert scale); SF-36: Physical Component Scale (PCS) and Mental Component Scale... (More)

Purpose Distal radius fracture often compromises working ability, but clinical implications are less studied in men due to its lower incidence. This study therefore describes sick leave in men with distal radius fracture, specifically exploring the impact of patient- and fracture-related factors. Methods Professionally active men aged 20–65 with distal radius fracture were followed prospectively for 1-year (n = 88). Data included treatment method, radiographic parameters pre/post treatment, complications, health, lifestyle and occupational demand. Patient outcomes were self-reported sick leave; Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score; pain (5 likert scale); SF-36: Physical Component Scale (PCS) and Mental Component Scale (MCS). Results Median sick leave was 4 weeks (IQR 0; 8); almost a third reported taking no sick leave. Categorizing sick leave into 3 groups (0–6, 7–12 and > 12 weeks), men with the longest sick leave had 22 points higher DASH score (p = 0.001) and 5 points lower PCS (p = 0.02) at 1 week and the difference remained over time; they were also older and more often treated surgically. The strongest predictors of length of sick leave were one-week post-fracture DASH score (rs = 0.4, p < 0.001), pain intensity (rs = 0.4, p < 0.001) and PCS (rs = − 0.4, p = 0.002). The correlation between sick leave and pain was even stronger analyzing treatment groups separately (closed reduction and cast rs = 0.56, p = 0.007, surgery rs = 0.42, p = 0.04). Conclusions Self-reported disability, pain and global health measurements as early as 1 week post-fracture are the strongest predictors of length of sick leave regardless of treatment; an important finding easily transferrable to clinical management of distal radius fractures.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Disability, Distal radius fracture, Men, Outcome, Pain, Sick leave
in
Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:32052265
  • scopus:85079373875
ISSN
1053-0487
DOI
10.1007/s10926-020-09880-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b41ffae1-c786-4767-b418-c4b76cf3f9fa
date added to LUP
2020-03-02 15:08:36
date last changed
2020-03-03 05:53:09
@article{b41ffae1-c786-4767-b418-c4b76cf3f9fa,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose Distal radius fracture often compromises working ability, but clinical implications are less studied in men due to its lower incidence. This study therefore describes sick leave in men with distal radius fracture, specifically exploring the impact of patient- and fracture-related factors. Methods Professionally active men aged 20–65 with distal radius fracture were followed prospectively for 1-year (n = 88). Data included treatment method, radiographic parameters pre/post treatment, complications, health, lifestyle and occupational demand. Patient outcomes were self-reported sick leave; Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score; pain (5 likert scale); SF-36: Physical Component Scale (PCS) and Mental Component Scale (MCS). Results Median sick leave was 4 weeks (IQR 0; 8); almost a third reported taking no sick leave. Categorizing sick leave into 3 groups (0–6, 7–12 and &gt; 12 weeks), men with the longest sick leave had 22 points higher DASH score (p = 0.001) and 5 points lower PCS (p = 0.02) at 1 week and the difference remained over time; they were also older and more often treated surgically. The strongest predictors of length of sick leave were one-week post-fracture DASH score (rs = 0.4, p &lt; 0.001), pain intensity (rs = 0.4, p &lt; 0.001) and PCS (rs = − 0.4, p = 0.002). The correlation between sick leave and pain was even stronger analyzing treatment groups separately (closed reduction and cast r<sub>s</sub> = 0.56, p = 0.007, surgery r<sub>s</sub> = 0.42, p = 0.04). Conclusions Self-reported disability, pain and global health measurements as early as 1 week post-fracture are the strongest predictors of length of sick leave regardless of treatment; an important finding easily transferrable to clinical management of distal radius fractures.</p>},
  author       = {Egund, Lisa and Önnby, Karin and Mcguigan, Fiona and Åkesson, Kristina},
  issn         = {1053-0487},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Disability and Pain are the Best Predictors of Sick Leave After a Distal Radius Fracture in Men},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10926-020-09880-4},
  doi          = {10.1007/s10926-020-09880-4},
  year         = {2020},
}