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Growth Hormone Dose-Dependent Pubertal Growth: A Randomized Trial in Short Children with Low Growth Hormone Secretion

Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin; Kristrom, Berit; Lundberg, Elena; Aronson, A. Stefan; Gustafsson, Jan; Hagenas, Lars; Ivarsson, Sten LU ; Jonsson, Bjorn; Ritzen, Martin and Tuvemo, Torsten, et al. (2014) In Hormone Research in Paediatrics2009-01-01+01:00 82(3). p.158-170
Abstract
Background/Aims: Growth hormone (GH) treatment regimens do not account for the pubertal increase in endogenous GH secretion. This study assessed whether increasing the GH dose and/or frequency of administration improves pubertal height gain and adult height (AH) in children with low GH secretion during stimulation tests, i. e. idiopathic isolated GH deficiency. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, clinical trial (No. 88-177) followed 111 children (96 boys) at study start from onset of puberty to AH who had received GH(33) mu g/kg/day for >= 1 year. They were randomized to receive 67 mu g/kg/day (GH(67)) given as one (GH(67x1); n = 35) or two daily injections (GH(33x2); n = 36), or to remain on a single 33 mu g/kg/day dose (GH(33x1); n =... (More)
Background/Aims: Growth hormone (GH) treatment regimens do not account for the pubertal increase in endogenous GH secretion. This study assessed whether increasing the GH dose and/or frequency of administration improves pubertal height gain and adult height (AH) in children with low GH secretion during stimulation tests, i. e. idiopathic isolated GH deficiency. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, clinical trial (No. 88-177) followed 111 children (96 boys) at study start from onset of puberty to AH who had received GH(33) mu g/kg/day for >= 1 year. They were randomized to receive 67 mu g/kg/day (GH(67)) given as one (GH(67x1); n = 35) or two daily injections (GH(33x2); n = 36), or to remain on a single 33 mu g/kg/day dose (GH(33x1); n = 40). Growth was assessed as height SDS gain for prepubertal, pubertal and total periods, as well as AH SDS versus the population and the midparental height. Results: Pubertal height SDS gain was greater for patients receiving a high dose (GH(67), 0.73) than a low dose (GH(33x1), 0.41, p < 0.05). AH(SDS) was greater on GH(67) (GH(67x1), -0.84; GH(33x2), -0.83) than GH(33) (-1.25, p < 0.05), and height SDS gain was greater on GH(67) than GH(33) (2.04 and 1.56, respectively; p < 0.01). All groups reached their target height SDS. Conclusion: Pubertal height SDS gain and AH SDS were dose dependent, with greater growth being observed for the GH(67) than the GH(33) randomization group; however, there were no differences between the once-and twice-daily GH(67) regimens. (C) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
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subject
keywords
Gain in height, Prepubertal growth, Growth hormone frequency, Delayed, infancy-childhood transition, Puberty
in
Hormone Research in Paediatrics2009-01-01+01:00
volume
82
issue
3
pages
158 - 170
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000345448500003
  • scopus:84906588161
ISSN
1663-2826
DOI
10.1159/000363106
language
English
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yes
id
b54b559b-2b4a-4a0d-a0ca-36a785661544 (old id 4982688)
date added to LUP
2015-02-03 07:10:18
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:19:14
@article{b54b559b-2b4a-4a0d-a0ca-36a785661544,
  abstract     = {Background/Aims: Growth hormone (GH) treatment regimens do not account for the pubertal increase in endogenous GH secretion. This study assessed whether increasing the GH dose and/or frequency of administration improves pubertal height gain and adult height (AH) in children with low GH secretion during stimulation tests, i. e. idiopathic isolated GH deficiency. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, clinical trial (No. 88-177) followed 111 children (96 boys) at study start from onset of puberty to AH who had received GH(33) mu g/kg/day for &gt;= 1 year. They were randomized to receive 67 mu g/kg/day (GH(67)) given as one (GH(67x1); n = 35) or two daily injections (GH(33x2); n = 36), or to remain on a single 33 mu g/kg/day dose (GH(33x1); n = 40). Growth was assessed as height SDS gain for prepubertal, pubertal and total periods, as well as AH SDS versus the population and the midparental height. Results: Pubertal height SDS gain was greater for patients receiving a high dose (GH(67), 0.73) than a low dose (GH(33x1), 0.41, p &lt; 0.05). AH(SDS) was greater on GH(67) (GH(67x1), -0.84; GH(33x2), -0.83) than GH(33) (-1.25, p &lt; 0.05), and height SDS gain was greater on GH(67) than GH(33) (2.04 and 1.56, respectively; p &lt; 0.01). All groups reached their target height SDS. Conclusion: Pubertal height SDS gain and AH SDS were dose dependent, with greater growth being observed for the GH(67) than the GH(33) randomization group; however, there were no differences between the once-and twice-daily GH(67) regimens. (C) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.},
  author       = {Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin and Kristrom, Berit and Lundberg, Elena and Aronson, A. Stefan and Gustafsson, Jan and Hagenas, Lars and Ivarsson, Sten and Jonsson, Bjorn and Ritzen, Martin and Tuvemo, Torsten and Westgren, Ulf and Westphal, Otto and Aman, Jan},
  issn         = {1663-2826},
  keyword      = {Gain in height,Prepubertal growth,Growth hormone frequency,Delayed,infancy-childhood transition,Puberty},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {158--170},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Hormone Research in Paediatrics2009-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Growth Hormone Dose-Dependent Pubertal Growth: A Randomized Trial in Short Children with Low Growth Hormone Secretion},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000363106},
  volume       = {82},
  year         = {2014},
}