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Biological valorization of low molecular weight lignin

Abdelaziz, Omar Y. LU ; Brink, Daniel P. LU ; Prothmann, Jens LU ; Ravi, Krithika LU ; Sun, Mingzhe LU ; Garcia Hidalgo, Javier LU ; Sandahl, Margareta LU ; Hulteberg, Christian P. LU ; Turner, Charlotta LU and Lidén, Gunnar LU , et al. (2016) In Biotechnology Advances 34(8). p.1318-1346
Abstract
Lignin is a major component of lignocellulosic biomass and as such, it is processed in enormous amounts in the pulp and paper industry worldwide. In such industry it mainly serves the purpose of a fuel to provide process steam and electricity, and to a minor extent to provide low grade heat for external purposes. Also from other biorefinery concepts, including 2nd generation ethanol, increasing amounts of lignin will be generated. Other uses for lignin – apart from fuel production – are of increasing interest not least in these new biorefinery concepts. These new uses can broadly be divided into application of the polymer as such, native or modified, or the use of lignin as a feedstock for the production of chemicals. The present review... (More)
Lignin is a major component of lignocellulosic biomass and as such, it is processed in enormous amounts in the pulp and paper industry worldwide. In such industry it mainly serves the purpose of a fuel to provide process steam and electricity, and to a minor extent to provide low grade heat for external purposes. Also from other biorefinery concepts, including 2nd generation ethanol, increasing amounts of lignin will be generated. Other uses for lignin – apart from fuel production – are of increasing interest not least in these new biorefinery concepts. These new uses can broadly be divided into application of the polymer as such, native or modified, or the use of lignin as a feedstock for the production of chemicals. The present review focuses on the latter and in particular the advances in the biological routes for chemicals production from lignin. Such a biological route will likely involve an initial depolymerization, which is followed by biological conversion of the obtained smaller lignin fragments. The conversion can be either a short catalytic conversion into desired chemicals, or a longer metabolic conversion. In this review, we give a brief summary of sources of lignin, methods of depolymerization, biological pathways for conversion of the lignin monomers and the analytical tools necessary for characterizing and evaluating key lignin attributes. (Less)
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Lignin, Lignocellulose, Biorefinery, Depolymerization, Catalysis, Aromatic metabolism, Biochemical conversion, Chromatography, Mass spectrometry
in
Biotechnology Advances
volume
34
issue
8
pages
29 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84995912410
ISSN
0734-9750
language
English
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yes
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b871fda6-6100-4b26-bf3f-73a88610fc1d
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biotechadv.2016.10.001
date added to LUP
2016-10-14 16:11:14
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2017-11-19 04:33:59
@article{b871fda6-6100-4b26-bf3f-73a88610fc1d,
  abstract     = {Lignin is a major component of lignocellulosic biomass and as such, it is processed in enormous amounts in the pulp and paper industry worldwide. In such industry it mainly serves the purpose of a fuel to provide process steam and electricity, and to a minor extent to provide low grade heat for external purposes. Also from other biorefinery concepts, including 2nd generation ethanol, increasing amounts of lignin will be generated. Other uses for lignin – apart from fuel production – are of increasing interest not least in these new biorefinery concepts. These new uses can broadly be divided into application of the polymer as such, native or modified, or the use of lignin as a feedstock for the production of chemicals. The present review focuses on the latter and in particular the advances in the biological routes for chemicals production from lignin. Such a biological route will likely involve an initial depolymerization, which is followed by biological conversion of the obtained smaller lignin fragments. The conversion can be either a short catalytic conversion into desired chemicals, or a longer metabolic conversion. In this review, we give a brief summary of sources of lignin, methods of depolymerization, biological pathways for conversion of the lignin monomers and the analytical tools necessary for characterizing and evaluating key lignin attributes.},
  author       = {Abdelaziz, Omar Y. and Brink, Daniel P. and Prothmann, Jens and Ravi, Krithika and Sun, Mingzhe and Garcia Hidalgo, Javier and Sandahl, Margareta and Hulteberg, Christian P. and Turner, Charlotta and Lidén, Gunnar and Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F.},
  issn         = {0734-9750},
  keyword      = {Lignin,Lignocellulose,Biorefinery,Depolymerization,Catalysis,Aromatic metabolism,Biochemical conversion,Chromatography,Mass spectrometry},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1318--1346},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Biotechnology Advances},
  title        = {Biological valorization of low molecular weight lignin},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2016},
}