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Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

Riihimäki, Matias LU ; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2016) In Scientific Reports 6.
Abstract

Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and... (More)

Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scientific Reports
volume
6
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:84978653500
  • wos:000379724300001
ISSN
2045-2322
DOI
10.1038/srep29765
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bd22f5dd-d86d-475b-a7cd-91a32d1b30ba
date added to LUP
2017-01-12 12:05:54
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:36:37
@article{bd22f5dd-d86d-475b-a7cd-91a32d1b30ba,
  abstract     = {<p>Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis.</p>},
  articleno    = {29765},
  author       = {Riihimäki, Matias and Hemminki, Akseli and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {2045-2322},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Scientific Reports},
  title        = {Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep29765},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2016},
}