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The role of fermentable carbohydrates and beverages in the symptomatology of functional gastrointestinal disease

Moding, Magnus and Ohlsson, Bodil LU (2017) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 52(11). p.1224-1234
Abstract

Objectives: The pathophysiology behind functional gastrointestinal disease (FGID) has not been defined, but an intestinal accumulation of fermentable short-chain carbohydrates (FODMAPs) is thought to be involved. A restricted coffee intake is recommended. The aim was to investigate if symptoms of FGID were associated with intake of certain foods (including FODMAPs), as well as beverages (including coffee and tea). Method and materials: Data were used from participants, age range 45–75 years, who had answered the EpiHealth questionnaire about their background factors, health status and intake of food and beverages. After exclusion of organic bowel diseases, 16,840 participants remained. The impact of food and beverages on functional... (More)

Objectives: The pathophysiology behind functional gastrointestinal disease (FGID) has not been defined, but an intestinal accumulation of fermentable short-chain carbohydrates (FODMAPs) is thought to be involved. A restricted coffee intake is recommended. The aim was to investigate if symptoms of FGID were associated with intake of certain foods (including FODMAPs), as well as beverages (including coffee and tea). Method and materials: Data were used from participants, age range 45–75 years, who had answered the EpiHealth questionnaire about their background factors, health status and intake of food and beverages. After exclusion of organic bowel diseases, 16,840 participants remained. The impact of food and beverages on functional abdominal pain, functional bloating, functional constipation and functional diarrhea were examined by adjusted binary logistic regression. Results: Wholemeal bread (Swedish cracker) (OR: 1.361; 95% CI: 1.001–1.851) and white bread (low fiber content) (OR: 1.527; 95% CI: 1.075–2.169) were associated with constipation, whereas soft wholemeal bread (high fiber content) was associated with diarrhea (OR: 1.601; 95% CI: 1.040–2.463). Cheese was associated with bloating (OR: 1.460; 95% CI: 1.004–2.123). A high tea intake was associated with abdominal pain (p for trend =.003), bloating (p for trend =.039) and diarrhea (p for trend <.001), whereas coffee intake was associated with a decreased risk of abdominal pain (p for trend =.002) and bloating (p for trend =.007). High soda intake associated with abdominal pain and bloating and juice with diarrhea. Conclusion: There are weak associations between intake of grain and dairy products and FGID symptoms. Tea is associated with increased risks, whereas coffee is associated with lower risks, of FGID symptoms.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Beverages, FODMAPs, functional gastrointestinal diseases
in
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
52
issue
11
pages
11 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85028551833
ISSN
0036-5521
DOI
10.1080/00365521.2017.1365931
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
be8582a4-1bb4-4359-985f-e0808b83f608
date added to LUP
2017-10-06 11:25:49
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:21:01
@article{be8582a4-1bb4-4359-985f-e0808b83f608,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: The pathophysiology behind functional gastrointestinal disease (FGID) has not been defined, but an intestinal accumulation of fermentable short-chain carbohydrates (FODMAPs) is thought to be involved. A restricted coffee intake is recommended. The aim was to investigate if symptoms of FGID were associated with intake of certain foods (including FODMAPs), as well as beverages (including coffee and tea). Method and materials: Data were used from participants, age range 45–75 years, who had answered the EpiHealth questionnaire about their background factors, health status and intake of food and beverages. After exclusion of organic bowel diseases, 16,840 participants remained. The impact of food and beverages on functional abdominal pain, functional bloating, functional constipation and functional diarrhea were examined by adjusted binary logistic regression. Results: Wholemeal bread (Swedish cracker) (OR: 1.361; 95% CI: 1.001–1.851) and white bread (low fiber content) (OR: 1.527; 95% CI: 1.075–2.169) were associated with constipation, whereas soft wholemeal bread (high fiber content) was associated with diarrhea (OR: 1.601; 95% CI: 1.040–2.463). Cheese was associated with bloating (OR: 1.460; 95% CI: 1.004–2.123). A high tea intake was associated with abdominal pain (p for trend =.003), bloating (p for trend =.039) and diarrhea (p for trend &lt;.001), whereas coffee intake was associated with a decreased risk of abdominal pain (p for trend =.002) and bloating (p for trend =.007). High soda intake associated with abdominal pain and bloating and juice with diarrhea. Conclusion: There are weak associations between intake of grain and dairy products and FGID symptoms. Tea is associated with increased risks, whereas coffee is associated with lower risks, of FGID symptoms.</p>},
  author       = {Moding, Magnus and Ohlsson, Bodil},
  issn         = {0036-5521},
  keyword      = {Beverages,FODMAPs,functional gastrointestinal diseases},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1224--1234},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {The role of fermentable carbohydrates and beverages in the symptomatology of functional gastrointestinal disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00365521.2017.1365931},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2017},
}