Advanced

Effects of detailed illustrations on science learning : an eye-tracking study

Lin, Yu Ying; Holmqvist, Kenneth LU ; Miyoshi, Kiyofumi and Ashida, Hiroshi (2017) In Instructional Science
Abstract

The eye-tracking method was used to assess the influence of detailed, colorful illustrations on reading behaviors and learning outcomes. Based on participants’ subjective ratings in a pre-study, we selected eight one-page human anatomy lessons. In the main study, participants learned these eight human anatomy lessons; four were accompanied by detailed illustrations, and the other four were accompanied by simplified illustrations. Participants completed a comprehension test and an evaluation questionnaire after reading each lesson. The results showed that detailed and simplified illustrations were equally effective in terms of learning outcomes. Eye-tracking data indicated that the detailed illustrations attracted attention in the... (More)

The eye-tracking method was used to assess the influence of detailed, colorful illustrations on reading behaviors and learning outcomes. Based on participants’ subjective ratings in a pre-study, we selected eight one-page human anatomy lessons. In the main study, participants learned these eight human anatomy lessons; four were accompanied by detailed illustrations, and the other four were accompanied by simplified illustrations. Participants completed a comprehension test and an evaluation questionnaire after reading each lesson. The results showed that detailed and simplified illustrations were equally effective in terms of learning outcomes. Eye-tracking data indicated that the detailed illustrations attracted attention in the initial learning stage and received more visual attention during the overall learning process. Notably, correlation analysis revealed that spending a greater proportion of time re-inspecting the simplified illustration was associated with higher test performances. By contrast, greater proportion of time spent re-inspecting the detailed illustration was not significantly correlated with learning outcomes. The results suggest that detailed illustrations could influence the learning process, and may support learning differently compared with simplified illustrations.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Cognitive load theory, Detailed illustrations, Eye-tracking, Motivation
in
Instructional Science
pages
25 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85021156308
ISSN
0020-4277
DOI
10.1007/s11251-017-9417-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c102e524-6811-4621-84d2-2647b3b06684
date added to LUP
2017-07-12 09:01:28
date last changed
2017-07-12 09:01:28
@article{c102e524-6811-4621-84d2-2647b3b06684,
  abstract     = {<p>The eye-tracking method was used to assess the influence of detailed, colorful illustrations on reading behaviors and learning outcomes. Based on participants’ subjective ratings in a pre-study, we selected eight one-page human anatomy lessons. In the main study, participants learned these eight human anatomy lessons; four were accompanied by detailed illustrations, and the other four were accompanied by simplified illustrations. Participants completed a comprehension test and an evaluation questionnaire after reading each lesson. The results showed that detailed and simplified illustrations were equally effective in terms of learning outcomes. Eye-tracking data indicated that the detailed illustrations attracted attention in the initial learning stage and received more visual attention during the overall learning process. Notably, correlation analysis revealed that spending a greater proportion of time re-inspecting the simplified illustration was associated with higher test performances. By contrast, greater proportion of time spent re-inspecting the detailed illustration was not significantly correlated with learning outcomes. The results suggest that detailed illustrations could influence the learning process, and may support learning differently compared with simplified illustrations.</p>},
  author       = {Lin, Yu Ying and Holmqvist, Kenneth and Miyoshi, Kiyofumi and Ashida, Hiroshi},
  issn         = {0020-4277},
  keyword      = {Cognitive load theory,Detailed illustrations,Eye-tracking,Motivation},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  pages        = {25},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Instructional Science},
  title        = {Effects of detailed illustrations on science learning : an eye-tracking study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11251-017-9417-1},
  year         = {2017},
}