Advanced

Decreasing prevalence of transmitted drug resistance among ART-naive HIV-1-infected patients in Iceland, 1996–2012

Sallam, Malik LU ; Özkaya Sahin, Gülsen LU ; Indriðason, Hlynur; Esbjörnsson, Joakim LU ; Löve, Arthur; Widell, Anders LU ; Gottfreðsson, Magnús and Medstrand, Patrik LU (2017) In Infection, Ecology and Epidemiology 7(1).
Abstract
Introduction: Resistance to antiretroviral drugs can complicate the management of HIV-1 infection and impair control of its spread. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence and transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance among 106 antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve patients diagnosed in Iceland (1996–2012).
Methods: HIV-1 polymerase sequences were analysed using the Calibrated Population Resistance tool. Domestic spread of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) was investigated through maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches.
Results: Among ART-naïve patients, the prevalence of TDR to any of the following classes (NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs) was 8.5% (95% CI: 4.5%- 15.4%): 6.6% to NRTIs, 0.9% to NNRTIs, and 1.9% to PIs.... (More)
Introduction: Resistance to antiretroviral drugs can complicate the management of HIV-1 infection and impair control of its spread. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence and transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance among 106 antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve patients diagnosed in Iceland (1996–2012).
Methods: HIV-1 polymerase sequences were analysed using the Calibrated Population Resistance tool. Domestic spread of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) was investigated through maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches.
Results: Among ART-naïve patients, the prevalence of TDR to any of the following classes (NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs) was 8.5% (95% CI: 4.5%- 15.4%): 6.6% to NRTIs, 0.9% to NNRTIs, and 1.9% to PIs. The most frequent NRTI mutation detected was T215C/D (n=7, 5.7%). The only NNRTI mutation detected was K103N (n=1, 0.9%). PI mutations detected were M46I (n=1, 0.9%) and L90M (n=1, 0.9%). Six patients harbouring T215C/D, were linked in a supported phylogenetic cluster. No significant association was found between TDR and demographic or risk groups. Trend analysis showed a decrease in the prevalence of TDR (1996–2012, p=0.003).
Conclusions: TDR prevalence in Iceland was at a moderate level and decreased during 1996-2012. Screening for TDR is recommended to limit its local spread and to optimize HIV-1 therapy. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Phylogeny, Resistance, Trend, Transmission, BEAST
in
Infection, Ecology and Epidemiology
volume
7
issue
1
pages
8 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2000-8686
DOI
10.1080/20008686.2017.1328964
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c9561e65-a9b0-4c4d-876a-e55323acc87a
date added to LUP
2017-06-13 19:43:39
date last changed
2017-07-11 09:07:33
@article{c9561e65-a9b0-4c4d-876a-e55323acc87a,
  abstract     = {Introduction: Resistance to antiretroviral drugs can complicate the management of HIV-1 infection and impair control of its spread. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence and transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance among 106 antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve patients diagnosed in Iceland (1996–2012).<br/>Methods: HIV-1 polymerase sequences were analysed using the Calibrated Population Resistance tool. Domestic spread of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) was investigated through maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches.<br/>Results: Among ART-naïve patients, the prevalence of TDR to any of the following classes (NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs) was 8.5% (95% CI: 4.5%- 15.4%): 6.6% to NRTIs, 0.9% to NNRTIs, and 1.9% to PIs. The most frequent NRTI mutation detected was T215C/D (n=7, 5.7%). The only NNRTI mutation detected was K103N (n=1, 0.9%). PI mutations detected were M46I (n=1, 0.9%) and L90M (n=1, 0.9%). Six patients harbouring T215C/D, were linked in a supported phylogenetic cluster. No significant association was found between TDR and demographic or risk groups. Trend analysis showed a decrease in the prevalence of TDR (1996–2012, p=0.003).<br/>Conclusions: TDR prevalence in Iceland was at a moderate level and decreased during 1996-2012. Screening for TDR is recommended to limit its local spread and to optimize HIV-1 therapy.},
  articleno    = {1328964},
  author       = {Sallam, Malik and Özkaya Sahin, Gülsen and Indriðason, Hlynur and Esbjörnsson, Joakim and Löve, Arthur and Widell, Anders and Gottfreðsson, Magnús and Medstrand, Patrik},
  issn         = {2000-8686},
  keyword      = {Phylogeny,Resistance,Trend,Transmission,BEAST},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {8},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Infection, Ecology and Epidemiology},
  title        = {Decreasing prevalence of transmitted drug resistance among ART-naive HIV-1-infected patients in Iceland, 1996–2012},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20008686.2017.1328964},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2017},
}