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The influence of calibration method and eye physiology on eyetracking data quality

Nyström, Marcus LU ; Andersson, Richard LU ; Holmqvist, Kenneth LU and van de Weijer, Joost LU (2013) In Behavior Research Methods 45(1). p.272-288
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

Recording eye movement data with high quality is often a prerequisite for producing valid and replicable results and for drawing well-founded conclusions about the oculomotor system. Today, many aspects of data quality are often informally discussed among researchers but are very seldom measured, quantified, and reported. Here we systematically investigated how the calibration method, aspects of participants' eye physiologies, the influences of recording time and gaze direction, and the experience of operators affect the quality of data recorded with a common tower-mounted, video-based eyetracker. We quantified accuracy, precision, and the amount of valid data, and found an increase in data quality... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

Recording eye movement data with high quality is often a prerequisite for producing valid and replicable results and for drawing well-founded conclusions about the oculomotor system. Today, many aspects of data quality are often informally discussed among researchers but are very seldom measured, quantified, and reported. Here we systematically investigated how the calibration method, aspects of participants' eye physiologies, the influences of recording time and gaze direction, and the experience of operators affect the quality of data recorded with a common tower-mounted, video-based eyetracker. We quantified accuracy, precision, and the amount of valid data, and found an increase in data quality when the participant indicated that he or she was looking at a calibration target, as compared to leaving this decision to the operator or the eyetracker software. Moreover, our results provide statistical evidence of how factors such as glasses, contact lenses, eye color, eyelashes, and mascara influence data quality. This method and the results provide eye movement researchers with an understanding of what is required to record high-quality data, as well as providing manufacturers with the knowledge to build better eyetrackers. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Behavior Research Methods
volume
45
issue
1
pages
272 - 288
publisher
The Psychonomic Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000319800900026
  • scopus:84874388660
ISSN
1554-351X
DOI
10.3758/s13428-012-0247-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c993985c-8f27-4b1a-bba6-7382738e33c0 (old id 3051373)
date added to LUP
2012-09-11 13:12:01
date last changed
2019-10-23 01:15:02
@article{c993985c-8f27-4b1a-bba6-7382738e33c0,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
Recording eye movement data with high quality is often a prerequisite for producing valid and replicable results and for drawing well-founded conclusions about the oculomotor system. Today, many aspects of data quality are often informally discussed among researchers but are very seldom measured, quantified, and reported. Here we systematically investigated how the calibration method, aspects of participants' eye physiologies, the influences of recording time and gaze direction, and the experience of operators affect the quality of data recorded with a common tower-mounted, video-based eyetracker. We quantified accuracy, precision, and the amount of valid data, and found an increase in data quality when the participant indicated that he or she was looking at a calibration target, as compared to leaving this decision to the operator or the eyetracker software. Moreover, our results provide statistical evidence of how factors such as glasses, contact lenses, eye color, eyelashes, and mascara influence data quality. This method and the results provide eye movement researchers with an understanding of what is required to record high-quality data, as well as providing manufacturers with the knowledge to build better eyetrackers.},
  author       = {Nyström, Marcus and Andersson, Richard and Holmqvist, Kenneth and van de Weijer, Joost},
  issn         = {1554-351X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {272--288},
  publisher    = {The Psychonomic Society},
  series       = {Behavior Research Methods},
  title        = {The influence of calibration method and eye physiology on eyetracking data quality},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13428-012-0247-4},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2013},
}