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The population impact of familial cancer, a major cause of cancer

Frank, Christoph LU ; Fallah, Mahdi LU ; Ji, Jianguang LU orcid ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2014) In International Journal of Cancer 134(8). p.906-1899
Abstract

The population attributable fraction (PAF) defines the proportion of a disease that would be prevented if the exposure to a particular risk factor was avoided. Familial risk is a known risk factor for many cancers, but an unbiased estimation of the PAF for familial risk requires a large study population to include rare cancers. PAFs and their corresponding standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for familial relative risk among first-degree relatives (FDRs) and second-degree relatives (SDRs) diagnosed with the same (concordant) invasive or in situ cancers. Calculations were based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database considering 8,148,737 individuals. To assess environmental effects, PAFs were also calculated for concordant... (More)

The population attributable fraction (PAF) defines the proportion of a disease that would be prevented if the exposure to a particular risk factor was avoided. Familial risk is a known risk factor for many cancers, but an unbiased estimation of the PAF for familial risk requires a large study population to include rare cancers. PAFs and their corresponding standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for familial relative risk among first-degree relatives (FDRs) and second-degree relatives (SDRs) diagnosed with the same (concordant) invasive or in situ cancers. Calculations were based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database considering 8,148,737 individuals. To assess environmental effects, PAFs were also calculated for concordant cancers among spouses. Almost all cancers showed a significant familial risk. The highest PAFs were found for the common cancers of the prostate (13.94%), breast (7.46%) and colorectum (6.78%) among the FDRs. In the FDRs, the overall PAF for any concordant cancer was 4.20%, but in the SDRs, it was only 0.34%. The overall PAFs for in situ cancers were 0.86% and 0.56% for the FDRs and SDRs, respectively. The overall independent familial PAF was 5.96% for the invasive and in situ cancers in the FDRs and SDRs. The cancers between spouses yielded an overall PAF of 0.14%. For esophageal cancer, the risk among spouses was higher than the familial risk. Our study shows that the overall familial PAF of 5.96%, although underestimated for sex-specific cancers, ranks as the third most common population burden after tobacco smoking and unhealthy diet.

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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology, Carcinoma in Situ/epidemiology, Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology, Esophageal Neoplasms/epidemiology, Family, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology, Risk, Risk Factors
in
International Journal of Cancer
volume
134
issue
8
pages
8 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons Inc.
external identifiers
  • pmid:24590453
  • scopus:84893763066
ISSN
0020-7136
DOI
10.1002/ijc.28510
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cd53d280-f918-403d-9cdf-27ce4d4cf30f
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 10:53:39
date last changed
2021-09-29 04:19:21
@article{cd53d280-f918-403d-9cdf-27ce4d4cf30f,
  abstract     = {<p>The population attributable fraction (PAF) defines the proportion of a disease that would be prevented if the exposure to a particular risk factor was avoided. Familial risk is a known risk factor for many cancers, but an unbiased estimation of the PAF for familial risk requires a large study population to include rare cancers. PAFs and their corresponding standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for familial relative risk among first-degree relatives (FDRs) and second-degree relatives (SDRs) diagnosed with the same (concordant) invasive or in situ cancers. Calculations were based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database considering 8,148,737 individuals. To assess environmental effects, PAFs were also calculated for concordant cancers among spouses. Almost all cancers showed a significant familial risk. The highest PAFs were found for the common cancers of the prostate (13.94%), breast (7.46%) and colorectum (6.78%) among the FDRs. In the FDRs, the overall PAF for any concordant cancer was 4.20%, but in the SDRs, it was only 0.34%. The overall PAFs for in situ cancers were 0.86% and 0.56% for the FDRs and SDRs, respectively. The overall independent familial PAF was 5.96% for the invasive and in situ cancers in the FDRs and SDRs. The cancers between spouses yielded an overall PAF of 0.14%. For esophageal cancer, the risk among spouses was higher than the familial risk. Our study shows that the overall familial PAF of 5.96%, although underestimated for sex-specific cancers, ranks as the third most common population burden after tobacco smoking and unhealthy diet. </p>},
  author       = {Frank, Christoph and Fallah, Mahdi and Ji, Jianguang and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {0020-7136},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {906--1899},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons Inc.},
  series       = {International Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {The population impact of familial cancer, a major cause of cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.28510},
  doi          = {10.1002/ijc.28510},
  volume       = {134},
  year         = {2014},
}