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Interactions between extreme climate and urban morphology : Investigating the evolution of extreme wind speeds from mesoscale to microscale

Javanroodi, Kavan LU and Nik, Vahid M. LU (2020) In Urban Climate 31.
Abstract

This paper investigates the interactions between urban morphology indicators and extreme weather variables. In this regard, variations of wind speed and air temperature at the urban microscale are studied for three urban morphologies by means of numerical simulations. Each urban model contains ninety-nine calculation points at different locations and heights to assess the variations during two 24-h cycles of extreme low and high wind speeds by introducing a microscale indicator. According to the results, transforming from mesoscale to microscale can considerably dampen the magnitude of wind speed (up to 66%) and amplify the air temperature (up to 39%). Moreover, the urban morphology parameters (layout geometry, final height and urban... (More)

This paper investigates the interactions between urban morphology indicators and extreme weather variables. In this regard, variations of wind speed and air temperature at the urban microscale are studied for three urban morphologies by means of numerical simulations. Each urban model contains ninety-nine calculation points at different locations and heights to assess the variations during two 24-h cycles of extreme low and high wind speeds by introducing a microscale indicator. According to the results, transforming from mesoscale to microscale can considerably dampen the magnitude of wind speed (up to 66%) and amplify the air temperature (up to 39%). Moreover, the urban morphology parameters (layout geometry, final height and urban density) can change the average magnitude of wind speed (up to 23%) and air temperature (up to 16%) at microscale. For extreme low wind speeds (0.16–1.14 m/s), strong correlations exist between the mesoscale and microscale magnitude of wind speed and air temperature, while there is no significant correlation for extreme high wind speeds (12.2–14 m/s). For extreme low wind speeds, stronger buoyancy effects are observed at the urban canopies. An easy-to-setup approach is proposed to count for microscale conditions during extreme low wind speeds in urban climate studies.

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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Air temperature, Extreme weather conditions, Metrological mesoscale model, Numerical simulations, Urban microscale model, Wind speed
in
Urban Climate
volume
31
article number
100544
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85075138557
ISSN
2212-0955
DOI
10.1016/j.uclim.2019.100544
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d0d29a67-660b-4f28-911c-70e4276eb935
date added to LUP
2019-11-28 07:47:13
date last changed
2020-12-29 03:48:14
@article{d0d29a67-660b-4f28-911c-70e4276eb935,
  abstract     = {<p>This paper investigates the interactions between urban morphology indicators and extreme weather variables. In this regard, variations of wind speed and air temperature at the urban microscale are studied for three urban morphologies by means of numerical simulations. Each urban model contains ninety-nine calculation points at different locations and heights to assess the variations during two 24-h cycles of extreme low and high wind speeds by introducing a microscale indicator. According to the results, transforming from mesoscale to microscale can considerably dampen the magnitude of wind speed (up to 66%) and amplify the air temperature (up to 39%). Moreover, the urban morphology parameters (layout geometry, final height and urban density) can change the average magnitude of wind speed (up to 23%) and air temperature (up to 16%) at microscale. For extreme low wind speeds (0.16–1.14 m/s), strong correlations exist between the mesoscale and microscale magnitude of wind speed and air temperature, while there is no significant correlation for extreme high wind speeds (12.2–14 m/s). For extreme low wind speeds, stronger buoyancy effects are observed at the urban canopies. An easy-to-setup approach is proposed to count for microscale conditions during extreme low wind speeds in urban climate studies.</p>},
  author       = {Javanroodi, Kavan and Nik, Vahid M.},
  issn         = {2212-0955},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Urban Climate},
  title        = {Interactions between extreme climate and urban morphology : Investigating the evolution of extreme wind speeds from mesoscale to microscale},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.uclim.2019.100544},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.uclim.2019.100544},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2020},
}