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Familial risks in and between stone diseases : Sialolithiasis, urolithiasis and cholelithiasis in the population of Sweden

Hemminki, Kari LU ; Hemminki, Otto; Koskinen, Anni I.M.; Försti, Asta LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Li, Xinjun LU (2018) In BMC Nephrology 19(1).
Abstract

Background: According to the literature the three stone diseases, sialolithiasis (SL), urolithiasis (UL) and cholelithiasis (CL) share comorbidities. We assess familial and spouse risks between these stone disease and compare them to familial risks for concordant (same) stone disease. Methods: Study population including familiar relationships was obtained from the Swedish Multigeneration Register and stone disease patients were identified from nation-wide medical records. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for 0-83 year old offspring when their first-degree relatives were diagnosed with stone disease and the rates were compared to individuals without a family history of stone disease. Numbers of offspring with SL were... (More)

Background: According to the literature the three stone diseases, sialolithiasis (SL), urolithiasis (UL) and cholelithiasis (CL) share comorbidities. We assess familial and spouse risks between these stone disease and compare them to familial risks for concordant (same) stone disease. Methods: Study population including familiar relationships was obtained from the Swedish Multigeneration Register and stone disease patients were identified from nation-wide medical records. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for 0-83 year old offspring when their first-degree relatives were diagnosed with stone disease and the rates were compared to individuals without a family history of stone disease. Numbers of offspring with SL were 7906, for UL they were 170,757 and for CL they were 204,369. Results: SIRs for concordant familial risks were 2.06 for SL, 1.94 for UL and 1.82 for CL. SIRs for SL and UL were slightly higher for women than for men. Familial risks between stone diseases were modest. The highest risk of 1.17 was for UL when family members were diagnosed with CL, or vice versa. The SIR for UL was 1.15 when family members were diagnosed with SL. Familial risks among spouses were increased only for UL-CL pairs (1.10). Conclusions: Familial risks for concordant SL were 2.06 and marginally lower for the other diseases. Familial risks between stone diseases were low but higher than risks between spouses. The data show that familial clustering is unique to each individual stone disease which would imply distinct disease mechanisms. The results cast doubt on the reported comorbidities between these diseases.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bladder stones, Heritability, Kidney stones, Salivary gland stones, Ureter stones
in
BMC Nephrology
volume
19
issue
1
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85049491105
ISSN
1471-2369
DOI
10.1186/s12882-018-0945-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d62d7caf-73ae-4902-98b4-2c78fd42312f
date added to LUP
2018-07-23 11:31:05
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:22:46
@article{d62d7caf-73ae-4902-98b4-2c78fd42312f,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: According to the literature the three stone diseases, sialolithiasis (SL), urolithiasis (UL) and cholelithiasis (CL) share comorbidities. We assess familial and spouse risks between these stone disease and compare them to familial risks for concordant (same) stone disease. Methods: Study population including familiar relationships was obtained from the Swedish Multigeneration Register and stone disease patients were identified from nation-wide medical records. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for 0-83 year old offspring when their first-degree relatives were diagnosed with stone disease and the rates were compared to individuals without a family history of stone disease. Numbers of offspring with SL were 7906, for UL they were 170,757 and for CL they were 204,369. Results: SIRs for concordant familial risks were 2.06 for SL, 1.94 for UL and 1.82 for CL. SIRs for SL and UL were slightly higher for women than for men. Familial risks between stone diseases were modest. The highest risk of 1.17 was for UL when family members were diagnosed with CL, or vice versa. The SIR for UL was 1.15 when family members were diagnosed with SL. Familial risks among spouses were increased only for UL-CL pairs (1.10). Conclusions: Familial risks for concordant SL were 2.06 and marginally lower for the other diseases. Familial risks between stone diseases were low but higher than risks between spouses. The data show that familial clustering is unique to each individual stone disease which would imply distinct disease mechanisms. The results cast doubt on the reported comorbidities between these diseases.</p>},
  articleno    = {158},
  author       = {Hemminki, Kari and Hemminki, Otto and Koskinen, Anni I.M. and Försti, Asta and Sundquist, Kristina and Sundquist, Jan and Li, Xinjun},
  issn         = {1471-2369},
  keyword      = {Bladder stones,Heritability,Kidney stones,Salivary gland stones,Ureter stones},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Nephrology},
  title        = {Familial risks in and between stone diseases : Sialolithiasis, urolithiasis and cholelithiasis in the population of Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12882-018-0945-y},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2018},
}