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Familial risks for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and autoimmune diseases

Hemminki, Kari LU ; Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2009) In Neurogenetics 10(2). p.6-111
Abstract

Population-level familial risks are not available for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and a few studies have analyzed familial association of ALS with other diseases. We used the Swedish Multigeneration Register to identify family members and link them to the Hospital Discharge Register to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for familial association in ALS and 33 autoimmune diseases. Among 4,970 ALS patients, familial SIR for offspring of affected parents was 4.71, for singleton siblings, it was 29.83, and for members of multiplex families, it was 1,100; 1.1% of the offspring had an affected parent, and 2.2% an affected sibling. The high risks among siblings without affected parents may suggest recessive inheritance. The... (More)

Population-level familial risks are not available for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and a few studies have analyzed familial association of ALS with other diseases. We used the Swedish Multigeneration Register to identify family members and link them to the Hospital Discharge Register to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for familial association in ALS and 33 autoimmune diseases. Among 4,970 ALS patients, familial SIR for offspring of affected parents was 4.71, for singleton siblings, it was 29.83, and for members of multiplex families, it was 1,100; 1.1% of the offspring had an affected parent, and 2.2% an affected sibling. The high risks among siblings without affected parents may suggest recessive inheritance. The SIR for spouse correlation for ALS was 2.35 which may imply the influence of yet unknown environmental factors in ALS susceptibility. ALS associated with Behcet disease, multiple sclerosis, ulcerative colitis, and Wegener granulomatosis; however, chance associations cannot be excluded. In this first population level family study on ALS and 33 autoimmune and related conditions, we found high familial risks depending on the proband. These findings should guide future genomic studies. The high spouse correlation will be a challenge to environmental epidemiology of ALS.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Age of Onset, Aged, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/genetics, Autoimmune Diseases/genetics, Child, Child, Preschool, Family, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Middle Aged, Registries, Risk Factors, Sweden, Young Adult
in
Neurogenetics
volume
10
issue
2
pages
6 pages
publisher
Springer Verlag
external identifiers
  • scopus:64149097833
ISSN
1364-6745
DOI
10.1007/s10048-008-0164-y
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
d8ebdf1a-c52a-4a5a-ba79-87993a8b2236
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 10:54:46
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:45:37
@article{d8ebdf1a-c52a-4a5a-ba79-87993a8b2236,
  abstract     = {<p>Population-level familial risks are not available for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and a few studies have analyzed familial association of ALS with other diseases. We used the Swedish Multigeneration Register to identify family members and link them to the Hospital Discharge Register to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for familial association in ALS and 33 autoimmune diseases. Among 4,970 ALS patients, familial SIR for offspring of affected parents was 4.71, for singleton siblings, it was 29.83, and for members of multiplex families, it was 1,100; 1.1% of the offspring had an affected parent, and 2.2% an affected sibling. The high risks among siblings without affected parents may suggest recessive inheritance. The SIR for spouse correlation for ALS was 2.35 which may imply the influence of yet unknown environmental factors in ALS susceptibility. ALS associated with Behcet disease, multiple sclerosis, ulcerative colitis, and Wegener granulomatosis; however, chance associations cannot be excluded. In this first population level family study on ALS and 33 autoimmune and related conditions, we found high familial risks depending on the proband. These findings should guide future genomic studies. The high spouse correlation will be a challenge to environmental epidemiology of ALS.</p>},
  author       = {Hemminki, Kari and Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1364-6745},
  keyword      = {Adolescent,Adult,Age of Onset,Aged,Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/genetics,Autoimmune Diseases/genetics,Child,Child, Preschool,Family,Female,Genetic Predisposition to Disease,Humans,Infant,Infant, Newborn,Male,Middle Aged,Registries,Risk Factors,Sweden,Young Adult},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {6--111},
  publisher    = {Springer Verlag},
  series       = {Neurogenetics},
  title        = {Familial risks for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and autoimmune diseases},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10048-008-0164-y},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2009},
}