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Growth pattern of experimental glioblastoma

Ahlstedt, Jonatan LU ; Förnvik, Karolina LU ; Helms, Gunther LU ; Salford, Leif G LU ; Ceberg, Crister LU ; Skagerberg, Gunnar LU and Nittby, Henrietta LU (2020) In Histology and Histopathology 35(8). p.871-886
Abstract
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive primary brain malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Researchers employ animal models to develop potential therapies. It is important that these models have clinical relevance. This means that old models, propagated for decades in cultures, should be questioned. Parameters to be evaluated include whether animals are immune competent or not, the infiltrative growth pattern of the tumor, tumor volume resulting in symptoms and growth rate.
We here describe the growth pattern of an experimental glioblastoma model in detail with GFP positive glioblastoma cells in fully immune competent animals
and study tumor growth rate and tumor mass as a function of time from... (More)
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive primary brain malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Researchers employ animal models to develop potential therapies. It is important that these models have clinical relevance. This means that old models, propagated for decades in cultures, should be questioned. Parameters to be evaluated include whether animals are immune competent or not, the infiltrative growth pattern of the tumor, tumor volume resulting in symptoms and growth rate.
We here describe the growth pattern of an experimental glioblastoma model in detail with GFP positive glioblastoma cells in fully immune competent animals
and study tumor growth rate and tumor mass as a function of time from inoculation.
We were able to correlate findings made with classical immunohistochemistry and MR findings. The tumor growth rate was fitted by a Gompertz function. The model predicted the time until onset of symptoms for 5000 inoculated cells to 18.7±0.4 days, and the tumor mass at days 10 and 14, which are commonly used as the start of treatment in
therapeutic studies, were 5.97±0.62 mg and 29.1±3.0 mg, respectively.
We want to raise the question regarding the clinical relevance of
the outline of glioblastoma experiments, where treatment is often
initiated at a very early stage. The approach presented here
could potentially be modified to gain information also from other tumor models. (Less)
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Histology and Histopathology
volume
35
issue
8
pages
871 - 886
publisher
Histology and Histopathology
external identifiers
  • pmid:32022242
  • scopus:85090508420
ISSN
1699-5848
DOI
10.14670/HH-18-207
project
Kartläggning av NS1 tumörer i råttor på en klinisk 3T MR kamera
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
dc8d7131-6224-48d4-b895-43013c523303
date added to LUP
2020-02-17 16:40:25
date last changed
2020-10-21 14:53:24
@article{dc8d7131-6224-48d4-b895-43013c523303,
  abstract     = {Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive primary brain malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Researchers employ animal models to develop potential therapies. It is important that these models have  clinical  relevance.  This means  that  old  models, propagated for  decades  in  cultures,  should  be questioned. Parameters to be evaluated include whether animals are immune competent or not, the infiltrative  growth  pattern  of  the  tumor,  tumor  volume  resulting  in  symptoms  and  growth  rate.<br/>We here describe the growth pattern of an experimental glioblastoma model in detail with GFP positive glioblastoma cells in fully immune competent animals<br/>and study tumor growth rate and tumor mass as  a  function  of  time  from  inoculation.<br/>We were  able  to correlate  findings  made  with  classical immunohistochemistry  and  MR  findings.  The  tumor  growth  rate  was  fitted  by  a  Gompertz  function. The  model  predicted  the  time  until  onset  of  symptoms  for  5000  inoculated  cells to 18.7±0.4 days, and the tumor mass at days 10 and 14,  which  are  commonly  used  as  the  start  of  treatment  in <br/>therapeutic studies, were 5.97±0.62 mg and 29.1±3.0 mg, respectively.<br/>We  want  to  raise  the  question  regarding  the  clinical  relevance  of <br/>the  outline  of glioblastoma experiments, where treatment is often<br/>initiated at a very early stage.  The approach presented here <br/>could potentially be modified to gain information also from other tumor models.},
  author       = {Ahlstedt, Jonatan and Förnvik, Karolina and Helms, Gunther and Salford, Leif G and Ceberg, Crister and Skagerberg, Gunnar and Nittby, Henrietta},
  issn         = {1699-5848},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {871--886},
  publisher    = {Histology and Histopathology},
  series       = {Histology and Histopathology},
  title        = {Growth pattern of experimental glioblastoma},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.14670/HH-18-207},
  doi          = {10.14670/HH-18-207},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2020},
}