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Smoking, smoking cessation, and fracture risk in elderly women followed for 10 years

Thorin, M. H. ; Wihlborg, A.; Åkesson, K. LU and Gerdhem, P. LU (2016) In Osteoporosis International 27(1). p.249-255
Abstract

Summary: This study examines the impact of smoking and smoking cessation on fracture risk in 75-year-old women followed for 10 years. Smoking increased fracture risk, especially for vertebral fractures. Smoking cessation decreased the risk for vertebral fractures but not for other fracture types. Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine effects of smoking and smoking cessation on fracture risk. Methods: This prospective observational population-based study followed 1033 women during 10 years from age 75. Data regarding smoking were collected at age 75. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for fracture were calculated using competing risks proportional hazards regression. Results: Both former smokers and... (More)

Summary: This study examines the impact of smoking and smoking cessation on fracture risk in 75-year-old women followed for 10 years. Smoking increased fracture risk, especially for vertebral fractures. Smoking cessation decreased the risk for vertebral fractures but not for other fracture types. Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine effects of smoking and smoking cessation on fracture risk. Methods: This prospective observational population-based study followed 1033 women during 10 years from age 75. Data regarding smoking were collected at age 75. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for fracture were calculated using competing risks proportional hazards regression. Results: Both former smokers and current smokers had an increased risk for any fracture (HR 1.30; 1.03–1.66, and HR 1.32; 1.01–1.73, respectively) and any osteoporotic fracture (hip, proximal humerus, distal radius, vertebra) (HR 1.31; 1.01–1.70 and HR 1.49; 1.11–1.98, respectively) compared to non-smokers. Former smokers had an increased risk for proximal humerus fractures (HR 2.23; 1.35–3.70), and current smokers had an increased risk for vertebral fractures (HR 2.30; 1.57–3.38) compared to non-smokers. After adjustment for weight, previous fractures, alcohol habits, bone mineral density (BMD), use of corticoids, vitamin D, bisphosphonates, and previous falls, former smokers had an increased risk for proximal humerus fracture (HR 2.07; 1.19–3.57) and current smokers had an increased risk for osteoporotic (HR 1.47; 1.05–2.05) and vertebral fractures (HR 2.50; 1.58–3.95) compared to non-smokers. Former smokers had a decreased risk for vertebral fractures, but not for other types of fractures, compared to current smokers. Conclusions: Smoking increased the risk for fracture among elderly women, especially vertebral fractures. Smoking cessation decreased the risk for vertebral fractures but not for other types of fractures.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Elderly, Fracture risk, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Women
in
Osteoporosis International
volume
27
issue
1
pages
7 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84954361482
  • WOS:000369525500029
ISSN
0937-941X
DOI
10.1007/s00198-015-3290-z
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
de99ddb0-f09e-474a-9d8b-653b3a9412fb
date added to LUP
2016-07-18 14:07:21
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:30:43
@article{de99ddb0-f09e-474a-9d8b-653b3a9412fb,
  abstract     = {<p>Summary: This study examines the impact of smoking and smoking cessation on fracture risk in 75-year-old women followed for 10 years. Smoking increased fracture risk, especially for vertebral fractures. Smoking cessation decreased the risk for vertebral fractures but not for other fracture types. Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine effects of smoking and smoking cessation on fracture risk. Methods: This prospective observational population-based study followed 1033 women during 10 years from age 75. Data regarding smoking were collected at age 75. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for fracture were calculated using competing risks proportional hazards regression. Results: Both former smokers and current smokers had an increased risk for any fracture (HR 1.30; 1.03–1.66, and HR 1.32; 1.01–1.73, respectively) and any osteoporotic fracture (hip, proximal humerus, distal radius, vertebra) (HR 1.31; 1.01–1.70 and HR 1.49; 1.11–1.98, respectively) compared to non-smokers. Former smokers had an increased risk for proximal humerus fractures (HR 2.23; 1.35–3.70), and current smokers had an increased risk for vertebral fractures (HR 2.30; 1.57–3.38) compared to non-smokers. After adjustment for weight, previous fractures, alcohol habits, bone mineral density (BMD), use of corticoids, vitamin D, bisphosphonates, and previous falls, former smokers had an increased risk for proximal humerus fracture (HR 2.07; 1.19–3.57) and current smokers had an increased risk for osteoporotic (HR 1.47; 1.05–2.05) and vertebral fractures (HR 2.50; 1.58–3.95) compared to non-smokers. Former smokers had a decreased risk for vertebral fractures, but not for other types of fractures, compared to current smokers. Conclusions: Smoking increased the risk for fracture among elderly women, especially vertebral fractures. Smoking cessation decreased the risk for vertebral fractures but not for other types of fractures.</p>},
  author       = {Thorin, M. H.  and Wihlborg, A. and Åkesson, K. and Gerdhem, P.},
  issn         = {0937-941X},
  keyword      = {Elderly,Fracture risk,Smoking,Smoking cessation,Women},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {249--255},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Osteoporosis International},
  title        = {Smoking, smoking cessation, and fracture risk in elderly women followed for 10 years},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-015-3290-z},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2016},
}