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Associations between Divorce and Onset of Drug Abuse in a Swedish National Sample

Edwards, Alexis C. ; Larsson Lönn, Sara LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Kendler, Kenneth S. and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2018) In American Journal of Epidemiology 187(5). p.1010-1018
Abstract

Rates of drug abuse are higher among divorced individuals than among those who are married, but it is not clear whether divorce itself is a risk factor for drug abuse or whether the observed association is confounded by other factors. We examined the association between divorce and onset of drug abuse in a population-based Swedish cohort born during 1965-1975 (n = 651,092) using Cox proportional hazards methods, with marital status as a time-varying covariate. Potential confounders (e.g., demographics, adolescent deviance, and family history of drug abuse) were included as covariates. Parallel analyses were conducted for widowhood and drug-Abuse onset. In models with adjustments, divorce was associated with a substantial increase in... (More)

Rates of drug abuse are higher among divorced individuals than among those who are married, but it is not clear whether divorce itself is a risk factor for drug abuse or whether the observed association is confounded by other factors. We examined the association between divorce and onset of drug abuse in a population-based Swedish cohort born during 1965-1975 (n = 651,092) using Cox proportional hazards methods, with marital status as a time-varying covariate. Potential confounders (e.g., demographics, adolescent deviance, and family history of drug abuse) were included as covariates. Parallel analyses were conducted for widowhood and drug-Abuse onset. In models with adjustments, divorce was associated with a substantial increase in risk of drug-Abuse onset in both sexes (hazard ratios > 5). Co-relative analyses (among biological relatives) were consistent with a partially causal role of divorce on drug-Abuse onset. Widowhood also increased risk of drug-Abuse onset, although to a lesser extent. Divorce is a potent risk factor for onset of drug abuse, even after adjusting for deviant behavior in adolescence and family history of drug abuse. The somewhat less-pronounced association with widowhood, particularly among men, suggests that the magnitude of association between divorce and drug abuse may not be generalizable to the end of a relationship.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
addiction, divorce, drug abuse, family history, widowhood
in
American Journal of Epidemiology
volume
187
issue
5
pages
9 pages
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85047130147
  • pmid:29155917
ISSN
0002-9262
DOI
10.1093/aje/kwx321
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e0377490-f3b5-41c7-ba89-2f12a892871d
date added to LUP
2018-10-29 09:31:40
date last changed
2020-01-13 01:06:42
@article{e0377490-f3b5-41c7-ba89-2f12a892871d,
  abstract     = {<p>Rates of drug abuse are higher among divorced individuals than among those who are married, but it is not clear whether divorce itself is a risk factor for drug abuse or whether the observed association is confounded by other factors. We examined the association between divorce and onset of drug abuse in a population-based Swedish cohort born during 1965-1975 (n = 651,092) using Cox proportional hazards methods, with marital status as a time-varying covariate. Potential confounders (e.g., demographics, adolescent deviance, and family history of drug abuse) were included as covariates. Parallel analyses were conducted for widowhood and drug-Abuse onset. In models with adjustments, divorce was associated with a substantial increase in risk of drug-Abuse onset in both sexes (hazard ratios &gt; 5). Co-relative analyses (among biological relatives) were consistent with a partially causal role of divorce on drug-Abuse onset. Widowhood also increased risk of drug-Abuse onset, although to a lesser extent. Divorce is a potent risk factor for onset of drug abuse, even after adjusting for deviant behavior in adolescence and family history of drug abuse. The somewhat less-pronounced association with widowhood, particularly among men, suggests that the magnitude of association between divorce and drug abuse may not be generalizable to the end of a relationship.</p>},
  author       = {Edwards, Alexis C. and Larsson Lönn, Sara and Sundquist, Jan and Kendler, Kenneth S. and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {0002-9262},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1010--1018},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {American Journal of Epidemiology},
  title        = {Associations between Divorce and Onset of Drug Abuse in a Swedish National Sample},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwx321},
  doi          = {10.1093/aje/kwx321},
  volume       = {187},
  year         = {2018},
}