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Familial risks for depression among siblings based on hospitalizations in Sweden

Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU ; Hemminki, Kari LU and Sundquist, Jan LU (2008) In Psychiatric Genetics 18(2). p.4-80
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Familial risks of depression have been assessed in small case-control studies, usually based on reported, but not medically verified depressions in family members; thus the degree of familial clustering for these diseases remains to be established.

METHODS: We conducted a nationwide study on familial risks of depression linking the Multigeneration Register of 0-72-year-old individuals to the Hospital Discharge Register for diagnosed depression patients in Sweden from 1987 to 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for affected singleton siblings, twins, and spouses by comparing those whose siblings or spouses had no recorded hospitalization for depression.

RESULTS: A total of 60 477 hospitalized... (More)

OBJECTIVE: Familial risks of depression have been assessed in small case-control studies, usually based on reported, but not medically verified depressions in family members; thus the degree of familial clustering for these diseases remains to be established.

METHODS: We conducted a nationwide study on familial risks of depression linking the Multigeneration Register of 0-72-year-old individuals to the Hospital Discharge Register for diagnosed depression patients in Sweden from 1987 to 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for affected singleton siblings, twins, and spouses by comparing those whose siblings or spouses had no recorded hospitalization for depression.

RESULTS: A total of 60 477 hospitalized cases and 3849 affected siblings were identified with a familial SIR of 2.95, which was independent of sex, age at diagnosis, and age differences between siblings. When both siblings were diagnosed with manic, bipolar, or major depression, the SIRs were 5.87, 10.23, and 2.79, respectively. The SIR for twin pairs was 4.57. The SIR for spouses was 1.76.

CONCLUSION: The significantly higher risk for siblings of depression patients than that for spouses suggests that heritable effects highlight familial susceptibility to this disease. To what extent it also contributes to familial depression remains to be established. The anticipated gene-environment interactions with sufficient sample sizes needs to be accommodated in future etiological studies on depression.

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author
publishing date
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Bipolar Disorder/epidemiology, Child, Child, Preschool, Depressive Disorder/epidemiology, Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology, Diseases in Twins/epidemiology, Family Health, Female, Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data, Humans, Infant, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data, Registries/statistics & numerical data, Sex Distribution, Siblings/psychology, Spouses/psychology, Sweden/epidemiology
in
Psychiatric Genetics
volume
18
issue
2
pages
5 pages
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN
1473-5873
DOI
10.1097/YPG.0b013e3282f08ac9
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
e1a4e3e0-a2cb-4f7b-aa89-1aa8dcc26cf6
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 10:59:45
date last changed
2019-05-02 04:02:04
@article{e1a4e3e0-a2cb-4f7b-aa89-1aa8dcc26cf6,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVE: Familial risks of depression have been assessed in small case-control studies, usually based on reported, but not medically verified depressions in family members; thus the degree of familial clustering for these diseases remains to be established.</p><p>METHODS: We conducted a nationwide study on familial risks of depression linking the Multigeneration Register of 0-72-year-old individuals to the Hospital Discharge Register for diagnosed depression patients in Sweden from 1987 to 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for affected singleton siblings, twins, and spouses by comparing those whose siblings or spouses had no recorded hospitalization for depression.</p><p>RESULTS: A total of 60 477 hospitalized cases and 3849 affected siblings were identified with a familial SIR of 2.95, which was independent of sex, age at diagnosis, and age differences between siblings. When both siblings were diagnosed with manic, bipolar, or major depression, the SIRs were 5.87, 10.23, and 2.79, respectively. The SIR for twin pairs was 4.57. The SIR for spouses was 1.76.</p><p>CONCLUSION: The significantly higher risk for siblings of depression patients than that for spouses suggests that heritable effects highlight familial susceptibility to this disease. To what extent it also contributes to familial depression remains to be established. The anticipated gene-environment interactions with sufficient sample sizes needs to be accommodated in future etiological studies on depression.</p>},
  author       = {Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Kristina and Hemminki, Kari and Sundquist, Jan},
  issn         = {1473-5873},
  keyword      = {Adolescent,Adult,Aged,Bipolar Disorder/epidemiology,Child,Child, Preschool,Depressive Disorder/epidemiology,Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology,Diseases in Twins/epidemiology,Family Health,Female,Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data,Humans,Infant,Male,Middle Aged,Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data,Registries/statistics & numerical data,Sex Distribution,Siblings/psychology,Spouses/psychology,Sweden/epidemiology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {4--80},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Psychiatric Genetics},
  title        = {Familial risks for depression among siblings based on hospitalizations in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/YPG.0b013e3282f08ac9},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2008},
}