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FRAME: femtosecond videography for atomic and molecular dynamics : Femtosecond videography

Ehn, Andreas LU ; Bood, Joakim LU ; Li, Zheming LU ; Berrocal, Edouard LU ; Aldén, Marcus LU and Kristensson, Elias LU (2017) In Light, science & applications 6(9). p.1-7
Abstract

Many important scientific questions in physics, chemistry and biology require effective methodologies to spectroscopically probe ultrafast intra- and inter-atomic/molecular dynamics. However, current methods that extend into the femtosecond regime are capable of only point measurements or single-snapshot visualizations and thus lack the capability to perform ultrafast spectroscopic videography of dynamic single events. Here we present a laser-probe-based method that enables two-dimensional videography at ultrafast timescales (femtosecond and shorter) of single, non-repetitive events. The method is based on superimposing a structural code onto the illumination to encrypt a single event, which is then deciphered in a post-processing step.... (More)

Many important scientific questions in physics, chemistry and biology require effective methodologies to spectroscopically probe ultrafast intra- and inter-atomic/molecular dynamics. However, current methods that extend into the femtosecond regime are capable of only point measurements or single-snapshot visualizations and thus lack the capability to perform ultrafast spectroscopic videography of dynamic single events. Here we present a laser-probe-based method that enables two-dimensional videography at ultrafast timescales (femtosecond and shorter) of single, non-repetitive events. The method is based on superimposing a structural code onto the illumination to encrypt a single event, which is then deciphered in a post-processing step. This coding strategy enables laser probing with arbitrary wavelengths/bandwidths to collect signals with indiscriminate spectral information, thus allowing for ultrafast videography with full spectroscopic capability. To demonstrate the high temporal resolution of our method, we present videography of light propagation with record high 200 femtosecond temporal resolution. The method is widely applicable for studying a multitude of dynamical processes in physics, chemistry and biology over a wide range of time scales. Because the minimum frame separation (temporal resolution) is dictated by only the laser pulse duration, attosecond-laser technology may further increase video rates by several orders of magnitude.

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Abstract (Swedish)
Many important scientific questions in physics, chemistry and biology require effective methodologies to spectroscopically probe
ultrafast intra- and inter-atomic/molecular dynamics. However, current methods that extend into the femtosecond regime are
capable of only point measurements or single-snapshot visualizations and thus lack the capability to perform ultrafast spectroscopic
videography of dynamic single events. Here we present a laser-probe-based method that enables two-dimensional videography
at ultrafast timescales (femtosecond and shorter) of single, non-repetitive events. The method is based on superimposing
a structural code onto the illumination to encrypt a single event, which is then deciphered in a... (More)
Many important scientific questions in physics, chemistry and biology require effective methodologies to spectroscopically probe
ultrafast intra- and inter-atomic/molecular dynamics. However, current methods that extend into the femtosecond regime are
capable of only point measurements or single-snapshot visualizations and thus lack the capability to perform ultrafast spectroscopic
videography of dynamic single events. Here we present a laser-probe-based method that enables two-dimensional videography
at ultrafast timescales (femtosecond and shorter) of single, non-repetitive events. The method is based on superimposing
a structural code onto the illumination to encrypt a single event, which is then deciphered in a post-processing step. This coding
strategy enables laser probing with arbitrary wavelengths/bandwidths to collect signals with indiscriminate spectral information,
thus allowing for ultrafast videography with full spectroscopic capability. To demonstrate the high temporal resolution of our
method, we present videography of light propagation with record high 200 femtosecond temporal resolution. The method is
widely applicable for studying a multitude of dynamical processes in physics, chemistry and biology over a wide range of time
scales. Because the minimum frame separation (temporal resolution) is dictated by only the laser pulse duration, attosecondlaser
technology may further increase video rates by several orders of magnitude. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Light, science & applications
volume
6
issue
9
article number
e17045
pages
7 pages
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:30167293
ISSN
2047-7538
DOI
10.1038/lsa.2017.45
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e1c2b3f8-42c7-43f4-bc8d-2ee638537895
date added to LUP
2018-09-26 15:52:28
date last changed
2020-10-19 11:54:15
@article{e1c2b3f8-42c7-43f4-bc8d-2ee638537895,
  abstract     = {<p>Many important scientific questions in physics, chemistry and biology require effective methodologies to spectroscopically probe ultrafast intra- and inter-atomic/molecular dynamics. However, current methods that extend into the femtosecond regime are capable of only point measurements or single-snapshot visualizations and thus lack the capability to perform ultrafast spectroscopic videography of dynamic single events. Here we present a laser-probe-based method that enables two-dimensional videography at ultrafast timescales (femtosecond and shorter) of single, non-repetitive events. The method is based on superimposing a structural code onto the illumination to encrypt a single event, which is then deciphered in a post-processing step. This coding strategy enables laser probing with arbitrary wavelengths/bandwidths to collect signals with indiscriminate spectral information, thus allowing for ultrafast videography with full spectroscopic capability. To demonstrate the high temporal resolution of our method, we present videography of light propagation with record high 200 femtosecond temporal resolution. The method is widely applicable for studying a multitude of dynamical processes in physics, chemistry and biology over a wide range of time scales. Because the minimum frame separation (temporal resolution) is dictated by only the laser pulse duration, attosecond-laser technology may further increase video rates by several orders of magnitude.</p>},
  author       = {Ehn, Andreas and Bood, Joakim and Li, Zheming and Berrocal, Edouard and Aldén, Marcus and Kristensson, Elias},
  issn         = {2047-7538},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1--7},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Light, science & applications},
  title        = {FRAME: femtosecond videography for atomic and molecular dynamics : Femtosecond videography},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/85447006/lsa201745.pdf},
  doi          = {10.1038/lsa.2017.45},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2017},
}