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Stroke doctors : Who are we? A World Stroke Organization survey

Meretoja, Atte; Acciarresi, Monica; Akinyemi, Rufus O; Campbell, Bruce; Dowlatshahi, Dar; English, Coralie; Henninger, Nils; Poppe, Alexandre; Putaala, Jukka and Saini, Monica, et al. (2017) In International Journal of Stroke 12(8). p.858-868
Abstract

Background Specialist training provides skilled workforce for service delivery. Stroke medicine has evolved rapidly in the past years. No prior information exists on background or training of stroke doctors globally. Aims To describe the specialties that represent stroke doctors, their training requirements, and the scientific organizations ensuring continuous medical education. Methods The World Stroke Organization conducted an expert survey between June and November 2014 using e-mailed questionnaires. All Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries with >1 million population and other countries with >50 million population were included ( n = 49, total 5.6 billion inhabitants, 85% of global strokes). Two... (More)

Background Specialist training provides skilled workforce for service delivery. Stroke medicine has evolved rapidly in the past years. No prior information exists on background or training of stroke doctors globally. Aims To describe the specialties that represent stroke doctors, their training requirements, and the scientific organizations ensuring continuous medical education. Methods The World Stroke Organization conducted an expert survey between June and November 2014 using e-mailed questionnaires. All Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries with >1 million population and other countries with >50 million population were included ( n = 49, total 5.6 billion inhabitants, 85% of global strokes). Two stroke experts from each selected country were surveyed, discrepancies resolved, and further information on identified stroke-specific curricula sought. Results We received responses from 48 (98%) countries. Of ischemic stroke patients, 64% were reportedly treated by neurologists, ranging from 5% in Ireland to 95% in the Netherlands. Per thousand annual strokes there were average six neurologists, ranging from 0.3 in Ethiopia to 33 in Israel. Of intracerebral hemorrhage patients, 29% were reportedly treated by neurosurgeons, ranging from 5% in Sweden to 79% in Japan, with three neurosurgeons per thousand strokes, ranging from 0.1 in Ethiopia to 24 in South Korea. Most countries had a stroke society (86%) while only 10 (21%) had a degree or subspecialty for stroke medicine. Conclusions Stroke doctor numbers, background specialties, and opportunities to specialize in stroke vary across the globe. Most countries have a scientific society to pursue advancement of stroke medicine, but few have stroke curricula.

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Journal Article
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International Journal of Stroke
volume
12
issue
8
pages
858 - 868
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85030166884
  • wos:000411795000009
ISSN
1747-4949
DOI
10.1177/1747493017701150
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English
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yes
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f7aa5cb5-bff0-4d56-ae79-359da4df069e
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2017-03-31 11:06:04
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2018-01-16 13:25:08
@article{f7aa5cb5-bff0-4d56-ae79-359da4df069e,
  abstract     = {<p>Background Specialist training provides skilled workforce for service delivery. Stroke medicine has evolved rapidly in the past years. No prior information exists on background or training of stroke doctors globally. Aims To describe the specialties that represent stroke doctors, their training requirements, and the scientific organizations ensuring continuous medical education. Methods The World Stroke Organization conducted an expert survey between June and November 2014 using e-mailed questionnaires. All Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries with &gt;1 million population and other countries with &gt;50 million population were included ( n = 49, total 5.6 billion inhabitants, 85% of global strokes). Two stroke experts from each selected country were surveyed, discrepancies resolved, and further information on identified stroke-specific curricula sought. Results We received responses from 48 (98%) countries. Of ischemic stroke patients, 64% were reportedly treated by neurologists, ranging from 5% in Ireland to 95% in the Netherlands. Per thousand annual strokes there were average six neurologists, ranging from 0.3 in Ethiopia to 33 in Israel. Of intracerebral hemorrhage patients, 29% were reportedly treated by neurosurgeons, ranging from 5% in Sweden to 79% in Japan, with three neurosurgeons per thousand strokes, ranging from 0.1 in Ethiopia to 24 in South Korea. Most countries had a stroke society (86%) while only 10 (21%) had a degree or subspecialty for stroke medicine. Conclusions Stroke doctor numbers, background specialties, and opportunities to specialize in stroke vary across the globe. Most countries have a scientific society to pursue advancement of stroke medicine, but few have stroke curricula.</p>},
  author       = {Meretoja, Atte and Acciarresi, Monica and Akinyemi, Rufus O and Campbell, Bruce and Dowlatshahi, Dar and English, Coralie and Henninger, Nils and Poppe, Alexandre and Putaala, Jukka and Saini, Monica and Sato, Shoichiro and Wu, Bo and Brainin, Michael and Norrving, Bo and Davis, Stephen},
  issn         = {1747-4949},
  keyword      = {Journal Article},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {858--868},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {International Journal of Stroke},
  title        = {Stroke doctors : Who are we? A World Stroke Organization survey},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1747493017701150},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2017},
}