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People's views on dreaming : Attitudes and subjective ream theories, with regard to age, education, and sex

Olsen, Michael Rohde; Schredl, Michael and Carlsson, Ingegerd LU (2016) In Dreaming 26(2). p.158-168
Abstract

The study investigated subjective theories of dream function (why do we dream)- measured as level of agreement with selected prescientific and contemporary views of science (N = 667) and thus explored differences in dream attitude with respect to age, educational level, and sex. A factor analysis revealed 3 factors. One can be described as seeing dreams as meaningful information processing (memory consolidation, sorting inputs, and solving problems), a 2nd included prescientific dream theory (dreams as messages from outside and/or from deceased, or dreams as prophecies). A 3rd factor included viewing dreams as insignificant products of the brain (random chemical signal interpretation and garbage products of the brain). Factor 1 was... (More)

The study investigated subjective theories of dream function (why do we dream)- measured as level of agreement with selected prescientific and contemporary views of science (N = 667) and thus explored differences in dream attitude with respect to age, educational level, and sex. A factor analysis revealed 3 factors. One can be described as seeing dreams as meaningful information processing (memory consolidation, sorting inputs, and solving problems), a 2nd included prescientific dream theory (dreams as messages from outside and/or from deceased, or dreams as prophecies). A 3rd factor included viewing dreams as insignificant products of the brain (random chemical signal interpretation and garbage products of the brain). Factor 1 was highly related to dream attitude-the more generally approving of dreams and dreaming, the more participants would regard dreams as meaningful information processing. Factor 2 was related to sex (women being more approving) and negatively related to level of education. Factor 3 was negatively related to the dream attitude scale but positively related to dream recall, which seemed counterintuitive. This could be seen as a way of explaining the often irrational content of dreams that participants were then able to recall. Women had a more supportive attitude toward dreams and dreaming.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Laymen theory of dream function, People view on dreaming, Sex difference, Subjective theory of dream function
in
Dreaming
volume
26
issue
2
pages
11 pages
publisher
Human Sciences Press, Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:84962489378
  • wos:000391571900006
ISSN
1053-0797
DOI
10.1037/drm0000020
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f93d438d-5f72-4f88-9be9-f7e715430885
date added to LUP
2017-02-01 09:43:51
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:35:01
@article{f93d438d-5f72-4f88-9be9-f7e715430885,
  abstract     = {<p>The study investigated subjective theories of dream function (why do we dream)- measured as level of agreement with selected prescientific and contemporary views of science (N = 667) and thus explored differences in dream attitude with respect to age, educational level, and sex. A factor analysis revealed 3 factors. One can be described as seeing dreams as meaningful information processing (memory consolidation, sorting inputs, and solving problems), a 2nd included prescientific dream theory (dreams as messages from outside and/or from deceased, or dreams as prophecies). A 3rd factor included viewing dreams as insignificant products of the brain (random chemical signal interpretation and garbage products of the brain). Factor 1 was highly related to dream attitude-the more generally approving of dreams and dreaming, the more participants would regard dreams as meaningful information processing. Factor 2 was related to sex (women being more approving) and negatively related to level of education. Factor 3 was negatively related to the dream attitude scale but positively related to dream recall, which seemed counterintuitive. This could be seen as a way of explaining the often irrational content of dreams that participants were then able to recall. Women had a more supportive attitude toward dreams and dreaming.</p>},
  author       = {Olsen, Michael Rohde and Schredl, Michael and Carlsson, Ingegerd},
  issn         = {1053-0797},
  keyword      = {Laymen theory of dream function,People view on dreaming,Sex difference,Subjective theory of dream function},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {158--168},
  publisher    = {Human Sciences Press, Inc.},
  series       = {Dreaming},
  title        = {People's views on dreaming : Attitudes and subjective ream theories, with regard to age, education, and sex},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/drm0000020},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2016},
}