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Inflammatory bowel disease promotes venous thrombosis earlier in life

Grip, O. LU ; Svensson, P. J. LU and Lindgren, Stefan LU (2000) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 35(6). p.619-623
Abstract

Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be at increased risk of having venous thromboembolism. Methods: Medical records from 1253 IBD patients attending hospital care during the years 1987-97 were studied. These patients were recruited from a population of 340,000 inhabitants. Patients with verified venous thrombosis were characterized clinically, and blood samples were examined for coagulopathy including analyses of antithrombin, plasminogen, protein C, protein S, factor V, and prothrombin mutations. As control groups we used 99 patients with verified venous thrombosis and no history of IBD and 288 volunteers with no history of thrombosis. Results: The incidence of venous thrombosis was 1.5/1000 IBD patients per... (More)

Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be at increased risk of having venous thromboembolism. Methods: Medical records from 1253 IBD patients attending hospital care during the years 1987-97 were studied. These patients were recruited from a population of 340,000 inhabitants. Patients with verified venous thrombosis were characterized clinically, and blood samples were examined for coagulopathy including analyses of antithrombin, plasminogen, protein C, protein S, factor V, and prothrombin mutations. As control groups we used 99 patients with verified venous thrombosis and no history of IBD and 288 volunteers with no history of thrombosis. Results: The incidence of venous thrombosis was 1.5/1000 IBD patients per year, which is comparable to the background population. The mean age was significantly lower in IBD patients than in non-IBD patients (53 versus 64 years, P = 0.0225). We found one patient with antithrombin deficiency but none with protein C, protein S, or plasminogen deficiency. Factor V mutation was as prevalent in IBD patients with thrombosis as in thrombotic non-IBD patients (27% versus 28%) and 3.0 times (95% confidence interval, 0.8-11.9) more frequent in IBD patients with thrombosis than in healthy controls. Prothrombin mutation was not detected in IBD patients with venous thrombosis. Conclusion: We found no increased incidence of venous thrombosis in IBD patients compared with a background population. However, IBD patients had venous thrombosis earlier in life than non-IBD patients. Although factor V mutation may contribute to thrombosis, IBD acts as a trigger through mechanisms that still remain unexplained.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Factor-V mutation, Inflammatory bowel disease, Prothrombin mutation, Venous thrombosis
in
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
35
issue
6
pages
619 - 623
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:10912662
  • scopus:0033938933
ISSN
0036-5521
DOI
10.1080/003655200750023589
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f9741c53-0dd1-4abb-b848-81b5aabfb4ac
date added to LUP
2019-08-07 13:30:29
date last changed
2019-11-25 09:33:32
@article{f9741c53-0dd1-4abb-b848-81b5aabfb4ac,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be at increased risk of having venous thromboembolism. Methods: Medical records from 1253 IBD patients attending hospital care during the years 1987-97 were studied. These patients were recruited from a population of 340,000 inhabitants. Patients with verified venous thrombosis were characterized clinically, and blood samples were examined for coagulopathy including analyses of antithrombin, plasminogen, protein C, protein S, factor V, and prothrombin mutations. As control groups we used 99 patients with verified venous thrombosis and no history of IBD and 288 volunteers with no history of thrombosis. Results: The incidence of venous thrombosis was 1.5/1000 IBD patients per year, which is comparable to the background population. The mean age was significantly lower in IBD patients than in non-IBD patients (53 versus 64 years, P = 0.0225). We found one patient with antithrombin deficiency but none with protein C, protein S, or plasminogen deficiency. Factor V mutation was as prevalent in IBD patients with thrombosis as in thrombotic non-IBD patients (27% versus 28%) and 3.0 times (95% confidence interval, 0.8-11.9) more frequent in IBD patients with thrombosis than in healthy controls. Prothrombin mutation was not detected in IBD patients with venous thrombosis. Conclusion: We found no increased incidence of venous thrombosis in IBD patients compared with a background population. However, IBD patients had venous thrombosis earlier in life than non-IBD patients. Although factor V mutation may contribute to thrombosis, IBD acts as a trigger through mechanisms that still remain unexplained.</p>},
  author       = {Grip, O. and Svensson, P. J. and Lindgren, Stefan},
  issn         = {0036-5521},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {619--623},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {Inflammatory bowel disease promotes venous thrombosis earlier in life},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/003655200750023589},
  doi          = {10.1080/003655200750023589},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2000},
}