Advanced

Common cancers share familial susceptibility : Implications for cancer genetics and counselling

Yu, Hongyao; Frank, Christoph LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Hemminki, Akseli and Hemminki, Kari LU (2017) In Journal of Medical Genetics 54. p.248-253
Abstract

Background It has been proposed that cancer is more common in some families than in others, but the hypothesis lacks population level support. We use a novel approach by studying any cancers in large threegeneration families and thus are able to find risks even though penetrance is low. Methods Individuals in the nation-wide Swedish Family- Cancer Database were organised in three generations and the relative risk (RR) of cancer was calculated to the persons in the third generation by the numbers of patients with cancer in generations 1, 2 and 3. Results The RRs for any cancer in generation 3 increased by the numbers of affected relatives, reaching 1.61 when at least seven relatives were diagnosed. The median patient had two affected... (More)

Background It has been proposed that cancer is more common in some families than in others, but the hypothesis lacks population level support. We use a novel approach by studying any cancers in large threegeneration families and thus are able to find risks even though penetrance is low. Methods Individuals in the nation-wide Swedish Family- Cancer Database were organised in three generations and the relative risk (RR) of cancer was calculated to the persons in the third generation by the numbers of patients with cancer in generations 1, 2 and 3. Results The RRs for any cancer in generation 3 increased by the numbers of affected relatives, reaching 1.61 when at least seven relatives were diagnosed. The median patient had two affected relatives, and 7.0% had five or more affected relatives with an RR of 1.46, which translated to an absolute risk of 21.5% compared with 14.7% in population by age 65 years. For prostate cancer, the RR was 2.85 with four or more affected family members with any cancer, and it increased to 14.42 with four or more concordant cancers in family members. RRs for prostate cancer were approximately equal (2.70 vs 2.85) if a man had one relative with prostate cancer or four or more relatives diagnosed with any cancer. Conclusions A strong family history of cancer, regardless of tumour type, increases cancer risk of family members and calls for mechanistic explanations. Our data provide tools for counselling of patients with cancer with both low and high familiar risks.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Medical Genetics
volume
54
pages
248 - 253
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:84988694079
  • wos:000397862600005
ISSN
0022-2593
DOI
10.1136/jmedgenet-2016-103932
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fdf9cadd-9d1c-4f79-8997-d3128971a03b
date added to LUP
2016-10-28 15:42:05
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:32:36
@article{fdf9cadd-9d1c-4f79-8997-d3128971a03b,
  abstract     = {<p>Background It has been proposed that cancer is more common in some families than in others, but the hypothesis lacks population level support. We use a novel approach by studying any cancers in large threegeneration families and thus are able to find risks even though penetrance is low. Methods Individuals in the nation-wide Swedish Family- Cancer Database were organised in three generations and the relative risk (RR) of cancer was calculated to the persons in the third generation by the numbers of patients with cancer in generations 1, 2 and 3. Results The RRs for any cancer in generation 3 increased by the numbers of affected relatives, reaching 1.61 when at least seven relatives were diagnosed. The median patient had two affected relatives, and 7.0% had five or more affected relatives with an RR of 1.46, which translated to an absolute risk of 21.5% compared with 14.7% in population by age 65 years. For prostate cancer, the RR was 2.85 with four or more affected family members with any cancer, and it increased to 14.42 with four or more concordant cancers in family members. RRs for prostate cancer were approximately equal (2.70 vs 2.85) if a man had one relative with prostate cancer or four or more relatives diagnosed with any cancer. Conclusions A strong family history of cancer, regardless of tumour type, increases cancer risk of family members and calls for mechanistic explanations. Our data provide tools for counselling of patients with cancer with both low and high familiar risks.</p>},
  author       = {Yu, Hongyao and Frank, Christoph and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Akseli and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {0022-2593},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {248--253},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Journal of Medical Genetics},
  title        = {Common cancers share familial susceptibility : Implications for cancer genetics and counselling},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2016-103932},
  volume       = {54},
  year         = {2017},
}