Advanced

Joining Forces to Save the Nation : Corporate Educational Governance in Republican China

Schulte, Barbara LU (2012) In The Chinese corporatist state : adaption, survival and resistance p.10-28
Abstract
This chapter reassesses the modernization processes at work in Republican China during the Warlord period between 1911 and 1927 by focusing on corporate, public action by non-state interest groups and organizations. In particular, it looks at modes of corporate governing at the interface of business/economy and education: the realm of vocational education. The chapter examines a particularly illuminative corpus of actors, the Chinese Association for Vocational Education (CAVE) (Zhonghua Zhiye Jiaoyushe), which was founded in Shanghai in 1917 by Huang Yanpei (1878–1965). CAVE was established amidst calls to “[save] the country through education” (jiaoyu jiuguo). This heterogeneous group comprising Confucian-educated scholars, modern... (More)
This chapter reassesses the modernization processes at work in Republican China during the Warlord period between 1911 and 1927 by focusing on corporate, public action by non-state interest groups and organizations. In particular, it looks at modes of corporate governing at the interface of business/economy and education: the realm of vocational education. The chapter examines a particularly illuminative corpus of actors, the Chinese Association for Vocational Education (CAVE) (Zhonghua Zhiye Jiaoyushe), which was founded in Shanghai in 1917 by Huang Yanpei (1878–1965). CAVE was established amidst calls to “[save] the country through education” (jiaoyu jiuguo). This heterogeneous group comprising Confucian-educated scholars, modern scientists with international experience, entrepreneurs, manufacturers, craftspeople, journalists, politicians, and political advisors were particularly active (and partly successful) in formulating and promoting vocational education through their engagement in the media, in politics, in professional associations and guilds, and in schools. On the one hand, CAVE represented a quest for coherence and continuities within a fragmented society (and of the tensions that arose from this quest) and, on the other, a search for a modern nation-state in which Chinese adolescence would be turned into a productive workforce and loyal citizenry. Almost inadvertently, the association, with its members coming from all realms of Chinese urban society, served also as a case in point for corporate governance to reach these aims of unity and modernity. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
corporatism, Republican China, vocational education
in
The Chinese corporatist state : adaption, survival and resistance
editor
Hsu, Jennifer Y. J. and Hasmath, Reza
pages
10 - 28
publisher
Routledge
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84905813599
ISBN
978-0-415-64072-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c5c008e4-9d9a-4e1f-b438-6af43660a27f (old id 3232322)
date added to LUP
2012-12-07 08:02:17
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:44:48
@misc{c5c008e4-9d9a-4e1f-b438-6af43660a27f,
  abstract     = {This chapter reassesses the modernization processes at work in Republican China during the Warlord period between 1911 and 1927 by focusing on corporate, public action by non-state interest groups and organizations. In particular, it looks at modes of corporate governing at the interface of business/economy and education: the realm of vocational education. The chapter examines a particularly illuminative corpus of actors, the Chinese Association for Vocational Education (CAVE) (Zhonghua Zhiye Jiaoyushe), which was founded in Shanghai in 1917 by Huang Yanpei (1878–1965). CAVE was established amidst calls to “[save] the country through education” (jiaoyu jiuguo). This heterogeneous group comprising Confucian-educated scholars, modern scientists with international experience, entrepreneurs, manufacturers, craftspeople, journalists, politicians, and political advisors were particularly active (and partly successful) in formulating and promoting vocational education through their engagement in the media, in politics, in professional associations and guilds, and in schools. On the one hand, CAVE represented a quest for coherence and continuities within a fragmented society (and of the tensions that arose from this quest) and, on the other, a search for a modern nation-state in which Chinese adolescence would be turned into a productive workforce and loyal citizenry. Almost inadvertently, the association, with its members coming from all realms of Chinese urban society, served also as a case in point for corporate governance to reach these aims of unity and modernity.},
  author       = {Schulte, Barbara},
  editor       = {Hsu, Jennifer Y. J. and Hasmath, Reza},
  isbn         = {978-0-415-64072-5},
  keyword      = {corporatism,Republican China,vocational education},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {10--28},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb5eed30)},
  series       = {The Chinese corporatist state : adaption, survival and resistance},
  title        = {Joining Forces to Save the Nation : Corporate Educational Governance in Republican China},
  year         = {2012},
}