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Gesture production and speech fluency in competent speakers and language learners

Graziano, Maria LU and Gullberg, Marianne LU (2013) Tilburg Gesture Research Meeting (TiGeR) 2013 In [Host publication title missing]
Abstract
It is often assumed that a main function of gestures is to compensate for expressive difficulties. This predicts that gestures should mainly occur with disfluent speech. However, surprisingly little is known about the relationship between gestures and fluent vs. disfluent speech. This study investigates the putative ompensatory role of gesture by examining competent speakers’ and language learners’ gestural production in fluent vs. non-fluent speech. Results show that both competent and less competent speakers predominantly produce gestures during fluent stretches of speech; ongoing gestures during disfluencies are suspended.

In all groups, the few gestures that are completed during disfluencies are both referential and pragmatic.... (More)
It is often assumed that a main function of gestures is to compensate for expressive difficulties. This predicts that gestures should mainly occur with disfluent speech. However, surprisingly little is known about the relationship between gestures and fluent vs. disfluent speech. This study investigates the putative ompensatory role of gesture by examining competent speakers’ and language learners’ gestural production in fluent vs. non-fluent speech. Results show that both competent and less competent speakers predominantly produce gestures during fluent stretches of speech; ongoing gestures during disfluencies are suspended.

In all groups, the few gestures that are completed during disfluencies are both referential and pragmatic. The findings strongly suggest that when speech stops, so do gestures, thus supporting the view of speech and gesture as an integrated system. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
second language acquisition, gestures, first language acquisition, speech fluency
in
[Host publication title missing]
publisher
Tilburg University
conference name
Tilburg Gesture Research Meeting (TiGeR) 2013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
46ec006a-7f8e-4932-bbb4-4ece4969dbc3 (old id 3955045)
alternative location
http://tiger.uvt.nl/pdf/papers/graziano.pdf
date added to LUP
2013-07-29 15:54:43
date last changed
2016-04-16 08:44:56
@misc{46ec006a-7f8e-4932-bbb4-4ece4969dbc3,
  abstract     = {It is often assumed that a main function of gestures is to compensate for expressive difficulties. This predicts that gestures should mainly occur with disfluent speech. However, surprisingly little is known about the relationship between gestures and fluent vs. disfluent speech. This study investigates the putative ompensatory role of gesture by examining competent speakers’ and language learners’ gestural production in fluent vs. non-fluent speech. Results show that both competent and less competent speakers predominantly produce gestures during fluent stretches of speech; ongoing gestures during disfluencies are suspended.<br/><br>
In all groups, the few gestures that are completed during disfluencies are both referential and pragmatic. The findings strongly suggest that when speech stops, so do gestures, thus supporting the view of speech and gesture as an integrated system.},
  author       = {Graziano, Maria and Gullberg, Marianne},
  keyword      = {second language acquisition,gestures,first language acquisition,speech fluency},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xaf2bc50)},
  series       = {[Host publication title missing]},
  title        = {Gesture production and speech fluency in competent speakers and language learners},
  year         = {2013},
}